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Conference Paper: Physical activity among Hong Kong children with disabilities: Contextual characteristics of special school environments

TitlePhysical activity among Hong Kong children with disabilities: Contextual characteristics of special school environments
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA).
Citation
The 13th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA 2014), San Diego, California, USA, 21-24 May 2014. In the Abstract Book of the Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2014, p. 74, abstract no. S24.3 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To document children’s physical activity (PA) in both structured and unstructured settings and examine modifiable contextual variables (Study 1); and to determine the impact of innovative electronic game on children’s activity levels at school (Study 2). Methods: Participants were children with five disability types in 10 special schools (Study 1), and children with mild intellectual disabilities in 3 special schools (Study 2). Children’s observed PA was examined using a validated observation tool (SOPARC) in structured (physical education, PE) and unstructured (recess, lunch, and before and after school) settings at school. Contextual characteristics of the activity areas (i.e., accessibility, usability, provision of supervision, organized activities, and equipment) were also assessed. Results: Study 1: Children engaged in greater amounts of MVPA in unstructured than structured settings. They were more active during recess and lunch periods than other settings including PE. Areas were generally usable, but frequently less accessible, supervised, or equipped. Children were more active in the activity areas when supervision and organized activities were provided. Study 2: Children did not increase energy expenditure in unstructured settings over baseline, indicating minimal effects of interactive electronic game on children’s activity accrual in the open school environments during free play. Conclusions: Children’s activity accrual is influenced by potentially modifiable contextual characteristics of the school environments. Meanwhile providing limited numbers of interactive electronic games as prompts for PA does not work well in the open school environments. A more sophisticated intervention design might help promote children’s active behavior at school.
DescriptionSymposia: S24
The Abstract Book can be viewed at: http://isbnpa2014.org/2014%20ABSTRACTS.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206115

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSit, HPen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, TLen_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, AMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-20T12:29:03Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-20T12:29:03Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA 2014), San Diego, California, USA, 21-24 May 2014. In the Abstract Book of the Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2014, p. 74, abstract no. S24.3en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206115-
dc.descriptionSymposia: S24-
dc.descriptionThe Abstract Book can be viewed at: http://isbnpa2014.org/2014%20ABSTRACTS.pdf-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To document children’s physical activity (PA) in both structured and unstructured settings and examine modifiable contextual variables (Study 1); and to determine the impact of innovative electronic game on children’s activity levels at school (Study 2). Methods: Participants were children with five disability types in 10 special schools (Study 1), and children with mild intellectual disabilities in 3 special schools (Study 2). Children’s observed PA was examined using a validated observation tool (SOPARC) in structured (physical education, PE) and unstructured (recess, lunch, and before and after school) settings at school. Contextual characteristics of the activity areas (i.e., accessibility, usability, provision of supervision, organized activities, and equipment) were also assessed. Results: Study 1: Children engaged in greater amounts of MVPA in unstructured than structured settings. They were more active during recess and lunch periods than other settings including PE. Areas were generally usable, but frequently less accessible, supervised, or equipped. Children were more active in the activity areas when supervision and organized activities were provided. Study 2: Children did not increase energy expenditure in unstructured settings over baseline, indicating minimal effects of interactive electronic game on children’s activity accrual in the open school environments during free play. Conclusions: Children’s activity accrual is influenced by potentially modifiable contextual characteristics of the school environments. Meanwhile providing limited numbers of interactive electronic games as prompts for PA does not work well in the open school environments. A more sophisticated intervention design might help promote children’s active behavior at school.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA).-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA)en_US
dc.titlePhysical activity among Hong Kong children with disabilities: Contextual characteristics of special school environmentsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSit, HP: sithp@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcManus, AM: alimac@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySit, HP=rp00957en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcManus, AM=rp00936en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros240749en_US
dc.identifier.spage74, abstract no. S24.3-
dc.identifier.epage74, abstract no. S24.3-

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