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Conference Paper: The Role of Oncogene in Mycobacteria-induced Antophagy in Human Macrophages

TitleThe Role of Oncogene in Mycobacteria-induced Antophagy in Human Macrophages
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjpaed.org/index.asp
Citation
Joint Annual Scientific Meeting of the Hong Kong Paediatric Society and Hong Kong Paediatric Nurses Association, Hong Kong, China, 15 June 2014. In the Hong Kong Journal of Paediatrics (New series), 2014, v. 19 n. 3, p. 202 How to Cite?
AbstractMacrophages are the major immunocytes to initiate both innate and adaptive immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), a causative agent of tuberculosis. Upon mycoabcteria infection, macrophages could eliminate the intracellular bacteria through different cell death pathways, including apoptosis and autophagy. c-Myc is a transcription factor that regulates a variety of target genes and control different cellular functions such as proliferation and immune resposnse. Recently, our group revealed that c-Myc has a potential role in regulating the antimicrobial responses in macrophages. Here we use BCG, a live attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, which is similar to Mtb in antigenic composition, as a model to study the role of c-Myc in regulating mycobacteria-induced autophagy. We first investigated the role of c-Myc in BCG-induced LC3BII levels. Knocking down c-Myc by siRNA could decrease BCG-induced LC3BII levels. We found that BCG-induced autophagy is dependent on JNK and p38 and independent on PI3K or ERK pathways. And knocking down of c-Myc could significantly inhibit phosphorylation of p38. In conclusion, c-Myc may play a positive role in mycobacteria-induced autophagy in human macrophages.
DescriptionPoster Presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206052
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.194
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.123

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorLing, WLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, ASYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, CBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-20T11:47:24Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-20T11:47:24Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJoint Annual Scientific Meeting of the Hong Kong Paediatric Society and Hong Kong Paediatric Nurses Association, Hong Kong, China, 15 June 2014. In the Hong Kong Journal of Paediatrics (New series), 2014, v. 19 n. 3, p. 202en_US
dc.identifier.issn1013-9923-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206052-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation-
dc.description.abstractMacrophages are the major immunocytes to initiate both innate and adaptive immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), a causative agent of tuberculosis. Upon mycoabcteria infection, macrophages could eliminate the intracellular bacteria through different cell death pathways, including apoptosis and autophagy. c-Myc is a transcription factor that regulates a variety of target genes and control different cellular functions such as proliferation and immune resposnse. Recently, our group revealed that c-Myc has a potential role in regulating the antimicrobial responses in macrophages. Here we use BCG, a live attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, which is similar to Mtb in antigenic composition, as a model to study the role of c-Myc in regulating mycobacteria-induced autophagy. We first investigated the role of c-Myc in BCG-induced LC3BII levels. Knocking down c-Myc by siRNA could decrease BCG-induced LC3BII levels. We found that BCG-induced autophagy is dependent on JNK and p38 and independent on PI3K or ERK pathways. And knocking down of c-Myc could significantly inhibit phosphorylation of p38. In conclusion, c-Myc may play a positive role in mycobacteria-induced autophagy in human macrophages.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjpaed.org/index.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Paediatrics (New series)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleThe Role of Oncogene in Mycobacteria-induced Antophagy in Human Macrophagesen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, L: vickyw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLing, WL: lingwl@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, ASY: asylau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, CB: jamesli@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, ASY=rp00474en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, CB=rp00496en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros241332en_US
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage202-
dc.identifier.epage202-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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