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Article: Primary care physicians' response to pandemic influenza in Hong Kong: A mixed quantitative and qualitative study

TitlePrimary care physicians' response to pandemic influenza in Hong Kong: A mixed quantitative and qualitative study
Authors
KeywordsPrimary care
Preventive behaviors
Influenza A
Hand hygiene
Vaccination
Issue Date2012
Citation
International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2012, v. 16, n. 9, p. e687-e691 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The current study was conducted to use a developed framework to appraise the public primary care response to pandemic 2009 influenza A H1N1 virus in Hong Kong in 2009. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 300 doctors working in public primary care clinics. In addition, a qualitative study was conducted in two selected general outpatient clinics (GOPCs) with 10 doctors between September and December 2009. Results: We found that there was an increase in clinical service demand for public primary care doctors and that there was lower compliance with hand washing as compared to the wearing of masks among GOPC doctors during the study period. Conclusions: Since hand hygiene and influenza vaccination are effective methods to prevent the spread of influenza infection, future studies should explore the reasons for non-compliance with these preventive behaviors among doctors. More education and training in dealing with influenza A H1N1 infection may be needed. © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205766
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.229
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.148
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Samuel Y. S.-
dc.contributor.authorKung, Kenny-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Martincs-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Carmen-
dc.contributor.authorTsui, Wendy-
dc.contributor.authorChan, King-
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Jun-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Nelson-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Anniewl-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Elizaly-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T08:02:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-06T08:02:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2012, v. 16, n. 9, p. e687-e691-
dc.identifier.issn1201-9712-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205766-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The current study was conducted to use a developed framework to appraise the public primary care response to pandemic 2009 influenza A H1N1 virus in Hong Kong in 2009. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 300 doctors working in public primary care clinics. In addition, a qualitative study was conducted in two selected general outpatient clinics (GOPCs) with 10 doctors between September and December 2009. Results: We found that there was an increase in clinical service demand for public primary care doctors and that there was lower compliance with hand washing as compared to the wearing of masks among GOPC doctors during the study period. Conclusions: Since hand hygiene and influenza vaccination are effective methods to prevent the spread of influenza infection, future studies should explore the reasons for non-compliance with these preventive behaviors among doctors. More education and training in dealing with influenza A H1N1 infection may be needed. © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases-
dc.subjectPrimary care-
dc.subjectPreventive behaviors-
dc.subjectInfluenza A-
dc.subjectHand hygiene-
dc.subjectVaccination-
dc.titlePrimary care physicians' response to pandemic influenza in Hong Kong: A mixed quantitative and qualitative study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijid.2012.03.015-
dc.identifier.pmid22789752-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865544535-
dc.identifier.volume16-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spagee687-
dc.identifier.epagee691-
dc.identifier.eissn1878-3511-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308020600009-

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