File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Global models of ant diversity suggest regions where new discoveries are most likely are under disproportionate deforestation threat

TitleGlobal models of ant diversity suggest regions where new discoveries are most likely are under disproportionate deforestation threat
Authors
KeywordsBiogeography
Formicidae
Issue Date2012
Citation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2012, v. 109, n. 19, p. 7368-7373 How to Cite?
AbstractMost of the described and probably undescribed species on Earth are insects. Global models of species diversity rarely focus on insects and none attempt to address unknown, undescribed diversity. We assembled a database representing about 13,000 records for ant generic distribution from over 350 regions that cover much of the globe. Based on two models of diversity and endemicity, we identified regions where our knowledge of ant diversity is most limited, regions we have called "hotspots of discovery."A priori, such regions might be expected to be remote and untouched. Instead, we found that the hotspots of discovery are also the regions in which biodiversity is the most threatened by habitat destruction. Our results not only highlight the immediate need for conservation of the remaining natural habitats in these regions, but also the extent to which, by focusing on well-known groups such as vertebrates, we may fail to conserve the far greater diversity of the smaller species yet to be found.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205759
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.423
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuénard, Benoît S.-
dc.contributor.authorWeiser, Michael D.-
dc.contributor.authorDunn, Robert R.-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T08:02:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-06T08:02:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2012, v. 109, n. 19, p. 7368-7373-
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205759-
dc.description.abstractMost of the described and probably undescribed species on Earth are insects. Global models of species diversity rarely focus on insects and none attempt to address unknown, undescribed diversity. We assembled a database representing about 13,000 records for ant generic distribution from over 350 regions that cover much of the globe. Based on two models of diversity and endemicity, we identified regions where our knowledge of ant diversity is most limited, regions we have called "hotspots of discovery."A priori, such regions might be expected to be remote and untouched. Instead, we found that the hotspots of discovery are also the regions in which biodiversity is the most threatened by habitat destruction. Our results not only highlight the immediate need for conservation of the remaining natural habitats in these regions, but also the extent to which, by focusing on well-known groups such as vertebrates, we may fail to conserve the far greater diversity of the smaller species yet to be found.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America-
dc.subjectBiogeography-
dc.subjectFormicidae-
dc.titleGlobal models of ant diversity suggest regions where new discoveries are most likely are under disproportionate deforestation threat-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1113867109-
dc.identifier.pmid22529355-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860799321-
dc.identifier.volume109-
dc.identifier.issue19-
dc.identifier.spage7368-
dc.identifier.epage7373-
dc.identifier.eissn1091-6490-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000304090600053-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats