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Article: Referrals from general practitioners to medical specialist outpatient clinics: Effect of feedback and letter templates

TitleReferrals from general practitioners to medical specialist outpatient clinics: Effect of feedback and letter templates
Authors
KeywordsTriage
Referral
Issue Date2007
Citation
Hong Kong Practitioner, 2007, v. 29, n. 9, p. 357-364 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To determine whether providing feedback and educating doctors about referral guidelines will help to improve the quality of referral letters and referral rates. Design: Prospective study. Subjects: Patients referred from Shatin region's general outpatient clinics (GOPCs) to medical specialist outpatient clinic at Prince of Wales Hospital between 1st October 2004 and 31st June 2005. Main outcome measures: Number of non-routine appointments, number of letters containing 1st priority and 2nd priority (P1/P2) criteria for early appointments, number of standard components included in referral letters. Results: The number of early appointments (within eight weeks) was significantly increased (2.18, 95% Cl 1.70-2.80). Doctors who have not received their specialist qualifications were the main subgroups who showed improvement after intervention [non-fellows/non-trainees: 2.70 (1.75-4.18); FM trainees: 1.78 (1.01-3.17)]. FM fellows have the highest but non-significant baseline and post-intervention early appointment rates (26.2% and 40.7%). No significant changes were noted in the number of components included in letters after intervention. Significant increase in inclusion of P1/P2 criteria was noted overall and for certain disease subgroups (blood pressure, cardiac related conditions, gastrointestinal problems and thyroid problems). In general, letters including P1/P2 criteria would result in early appointment booking (2.03, 95% Cl 1.52-2.71), although this was not the case for certain disease subgroups. Conclusion: Providing feedback and information on referral guidelines to doctors in GOPCs helps to increase the quality of referral letters.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205717
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKung, Kenny-
dc.contributor.authorLam, Augustine-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Philip-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T08:02:15Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-06T08:02:15Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Practitioner, 2007, v. 29, n. 9, p. 357-364-
dc.identifier.issn1027-3948-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205717-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine whether providing feedback and educating doctors about referral guidelines will help to improve the quality of referral letters and referral rates. Design: Prospective study. Subjects: Patients referred from Shatin region's general outpatient clinics (GOPCs) to medical specialist outpatient clinic at Prince of Wales Hospital between 1st October 2004 and 31st June 2005. Main outcome measures: Number of non-routine appointments, number of letters containing 1st priority and 2nd priority (P1/P2) criteria for early appointments, number of standard components included in referral letters. Results: The number of early appointments (within eight weeks) was significantly increased (2.18, 95% Cl 1.70-2.80). Doctors who have not received their specialist qualifications were the main subgroups who showed improvement after intervention [non-fellows/non-trainees: 2.70 (1.75-4.18); FM trainees: 1.78 (1.01-3.17)]. FM fellows have the highest but non-significant baseline and post-intervention early appointment rates (26.2% and 40.7%). No significant changes were noted in the number of components included in letters after intervention. Significant increase in inclusion of P1/P2 criteria was noted overall and for certain disease subgroups (blood pressure, cardiac related conditions, gastrointestinal problems and thyroid problems). In general, letters including P1/P2 criteria would result in early appointment booking (2.03, 95% Cl 1.52-2.71), although this was not the case for certain disease subgroups. Conclusion: Providing feedback and information on referral guidelines to doctors in GOPCs helps to increase the quality of referral letters.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Practitioner-
dc.subjectTriage-
dc.subjectReferral-
dc.titleReferrals from general practitioners to medical specialist outpatient clinics: Effect of feedback and letter templates-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-36749008990-
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage357-
dc.identifier.epage364-

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