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Article: Developmental dyscalculia and low numeracy in Chinese children

TitleDevelopmental dyscalculia and low numeracy in Chinese children
Authors
KeywordsLow numeracy
Dyscalculia
Symbolic processing
Mathematical achievement
Non-symbolic processing
Issue Date2013
Citation
Research in Developmental Disabilities, 2013, v. 34, n. 5, p. 1613-1622 How to Cite?
AbstractChildren struggle with mathematics for different reasons. Developmental dyscalculia and low numeracy - two kinds of mathematical difficulties - may have their roots, respectively, in poor understanding of exact non-symbolic numerosities and of symbolic numerals. This study was the first to explore whether Chinese children, despite cultural and linguistic factors supporting their mathematical learning, also showed such mathematical difficulties and whether such difficulties have measurable impact on children's early school mathematical performance. First-graders, classified as dyscalculia, low numeracy, or normal achievement, were compared for their performance in various school mathematical tasks requiring a grasp of non-symbolic numerosities (i.e., non-symbolic tasks) or an understanding of symbolic numerals (i.e., symbolic tasks). Children with dyscalculia showed poorer performance than their peers in non-symbolic tasks but not symbolic ones, whereas those with low numeracy showed poorer performance in symbolic tasks but not non-symbolic ones. As hypothesized, these findings suggested that dyscalculia and low numeracy were distinct deficits and caused by deficits in non-symbolic and symbolic processing, respectively. These findings went beyond prior research that only documented generally low mathematical achievements for these two groups of children. Moreover, these deficits appeared to be persistent and could not be remedied simply through day-to-day school mathematical learning. The present findings highlighted the importance of tailoring early learning support for children with these distinct deficits, and pointed to future directions for the screening of such mathematical difficulties among Chinese children. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205711
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.877
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.967

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Winnie Wai Lan-
dc.contributor.authorAu, Terry K. F.-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Joey C Y-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T08:02:14Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-06T08:02:14Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationResearch in Developmental Disabilities, 2013, v. 34, n. 5, p. 1613-1622-
dc.identifier.issn0891-4222-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205711-
dc.description.abstractChildren struggle with mathematics for different reasons. Developmental dyscalculia and low numeracy - two kinds of mathematical difficulties - may have their roots, respectively, in poor understanding of exact non-symbolic numerosities and of symbolic numerals. This study was the first to explore whether Chinese children, despite cultural and linguistic factors supporting their mathematical learning, also showed such mathematical difficulties and whether such difficulties have measurable impact on children's early school mathematical performance. First-graders, classified as dyscalculia, low numeracy, or normal achievement, were compared for their performance in various school mathematical tasks requiring a grasp of non-symbolic numerosities (i.e., non-symbolic tasks) or an understanding of symbolic numerals (i.e., symbolic tasks). Children with dyscalculia showed poorer performance than their peers in non-symbolic tasks but not symbolic ones, whereas those with low numeracy showed poorer performance in symbolic tasks but not non-symbolic ones. As hypothesized, these findings suggested that dyscalculia and low numeracy were distinct deficits and caused by deficits in non-symbolic and symbolic processing, respectively. These findings went beyond prior research that only documented generally low mathematical achievements for these two groups of children. Moreover, these deficits appeared to be persistent and could not be remedied simply through day-to-day school mathematical learning. The present findings highlighted the importance of tailoring early learning support for children with these distinct deficits, and pointed to future directions for the screening of such mathematical difficulties among Chinese children. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofResearch in Developmental Disabilities-
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Research in Developmental Disabilities. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Research in Developmental Disabilities, 2013, v. 34 n. 5, p. 1613-1622. DOI: 10.1016/j.ridd.2013.01.030-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectLow numeracy-
dc.subjectDyscalculia-
dc.subjectSymbolic processing-
dc.subjectMathematical achievement-
dc.subjectNon-symbolic processing-
dc.titleDevelopmental dyscalculia and low numeracy in Chinese children-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ridd.2013.01.030-
dc.identifier.pmid23475011-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84874792788-
dc.identifier.hkuros222911-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage1613-
dc.identifier.epage1622-
dc.identifier.eissn1873-3379-

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