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Article: Sources and trends of environmental mercury emissions in Asia

TitleSources and trends of environmental mercury emissions in Asia
Authors
KeywordsMercury
Sources
Anthropogenic emissions
Trends
Asia
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2006, v. 368 n. 2-3, p. 649-662 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper focuses on environmental mercury emissions in Asia and elaborates its probable trend in the future and associated implications given the anticipated socioeconomic outlook and other macro-environmental factors. Among the various regions, Asia has become the largest contributor of anthropogenic atmospheric Hg, responsible for over half of the global emission. In the next few decades, a significant increase in anthropogenic Hg emissions in Asia is likely owing to rapid economic and industrial development, unless drastic measures are taken. In particular, the dominance of Asia in some Hg-emitting industries, such as coal combustion, steel production and gold mining, provokes a serious environmental concern over their potential contributions of incidental Hg in the region. Moreover, the increasing prevalence of electrical and electronic manufacturing industry as a user and a contributor of Hg in Asia is also worrying. Specifically, disposal of obsolete electrical and electronic wastes represents a phenomenon increasingly encountered in Asia. In addition to escalating anthropogenic Hg emissions in Asia, associated environmental and health implications may also exacerbate in the region for the probable effects of a unique combination of climatic (e.g. subtropical climate), environmental (e.g. acid rain) and socioeconomic factors (e.g. high population density). Hence, much effort is still needed to understand the role of Asia in global Hg cycle and associated environmental and health effects in the region.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205671
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.976
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.702
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CSC-
dc.contributor.authorDuzgoren-Aydin, NS-
dc.contributor.authorAydin, A-
dc.contributor.authorWong, MH-
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-30T03:10:41Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-30T03:10:41Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationScience of the Total Environment, 2006, v. 368 n. 2-3, p. 649-662-
dc.identifier.issn0048-9697-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205671-
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses on environmental mercury emissions in Asia and elaborates its probable trend in the future and associated implications given the anticipated socioeconomic outlook and other macro-environmental factors. Among the various regions, Asia has become the largest contributor of anthropogenic atmospheric Hg, responsible for over half of the global emission. In the next few decades, a significant increase in anthropogenic Hg emissions in Asia is likely owing to rapid economic and industrial development, unless drastic measures are taken. In particular, the dominance of Asia in some Hg-emitting industries, such as coal combustion, steel production and gold mining, provokes a serious environmental concern over their potential contributions of incidental Hg in the region. Moreover, the increasing prevalence of electrical and electronic manufacturing industry as a user and a contributor of Hg in Asia is also worrying. Specifically, disposal of obsolete electrical and electronic wastes represents a phenomenon increasingly encountered in Asia. In addition to escalating anthropogenic Hg emissions in Asia, associated environmental and health implications may also exacerbate in the region for the probable effects of a unique combination of climatic (e.g. subtropical climate), environmental (e.g. acid rain) and socioeconomic factors (e.g. high population density). Hence, much effort is still needed to understand the role of Asia in global Hg cycle and associated environmental and health effects in the region.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv-
dc.relation.ispartofScience of the Total Environment-
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in <Journal title>. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL#, ISSUE#, (DATE)] DOI#-
dc.subjectMercury-
dc.subjectSources-
dc.subjectAnthropogenic emissions-
dc.subjectTrends-
dc.subjectAsia-
dc.titleSources and trends of environmental mercury emissions in Asiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2005.11.024-
dc.identifier.pmid16405972-
dc.identifier.hkuros120333-
dc.identifier.volume368-
dc.identifier.issue2-3-
dc.identifier.spage649-
dc.identifier.epage662-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240270700019-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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