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Conference Paper: Self-reported and caregiver-observed signs of cognitive impairments in help-seekers

TitleSelf-reported and caregiver-observed signs of cognitive impairments in help-seekers
Authors
KeywordsGerontology and geriatrics
Issue Date2014
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://gerontologist.gerontologyjournals.org
Citation
The 67th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA 2014), Washington DC., 5-9 November 2014. In The Gerontologist, 2014, v. 54 suppl. 2, p. 235 How to Cite?
AbstractIncongruity between subjective complaints and informant observation of cognitive impairments poses barriers to help-seeking. Methods: Casenote review of 266 dyads seeking assessment for suspected dementia between 2006 and 2013. Chi-square and Kappa coefficient were calculated between self-reported and caregiver-observed warning signs. Findings: Caregivers on average reported 1.2 (S.D. 1.6) more signs than the person with suspected dementia. The most common complaints made by both parties were: memory loss (72.9%), misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps (10.2%), and confusion over time or place (3.4%). Agreement was in general very low in all types of complaints (all k<.02). Disagreement was significant regarding complaints of confusion over time or place (χ2=6.5, p=.02), withdrawal from work or social activities (χ2=27.8, p<.01), and somatic complaints (χ2=7.0, p=.04). Implications: People with suspected dementia and their caregivers tend not to agree on cognitive complaints, which may be due to decreased insight or fear.
DescriptionMeeting Theme: Making Connections: From Cells to Societies
This free journal suppl. entitled: 2014 GSA Annual Scientific Meeting Abstracts
Session 685 (Symposium): Help-Seeking and Early Detection of Cognitive Impairments in the Community
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205511
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.168
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.584

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, AHY-
dc.contributor.authorLou, VW-
dc.contributor.authorNg, CKM-
dc.contributor.authorLum, TYS-
dc.contributor.authorWong, GHY-
dc.contributor.authorLau, MY-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, D-
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T02:59:06Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T02:59:06Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe 67th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA 2014), Washington DC., 5-9 November 2014. In The Gerontologist, 2014, v. 54 suppl. 2, p. 235-
dc.identifier.issn0016-9013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205511-
dc.descriptionMeeting Theme: Making Connections: From Cells to Societies-
dc.descriptionThis free journal suppl. entitled: 2014 GSA Annual Scientific Meeting Abstracts-
dc.descriptionSession 685 (Symposium): Help-Seeking and Early Detection of Cognitive Impairments in the Community-
dc.description.abstractIncongruity between subjective complaints and informant observation of cognitive impairments poses barriers to help-seeking. Methods: Casenote review of 266 dyads seeking assessment for suspected dementia between 2006 and 2013. Chi-square and Kappa coefficient were calculated between self-reported and caregiver-observed warning signs. Findings: Caregivers on average reported 1.2 (S.D. 1.6) more signs than the person with suspected dementia. The most common complaints made by both parties were: memory loss (72.9%), misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps (10.2%), and confusion over time or place (3.4%). Agreement was in general very low in all types of complaints (all k<.02). Disagreement was significant regarding complaints of confusion over time or place (χ2=6.5, p=.02), withdrawal from work or social activities (χ2=27.8, p<.01), and somatic complaints (χ2=7.0, p=.04). Implications: People with suspected dementia and their caregivers tend not to agree on cognitive complaints, which may be due to decreased insight or fear.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://gerontologist.gerontologyjournals.org-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Gerontologist-
dc.subjectGerontology and geriatrics-
dc.titleSelf-reported and caregiver-observed signs of cognitive impairments in help-seekers-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailHo, AHY: andyho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLou, VW: wlou@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLum, TYS: tlum@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, GHY: ghywong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, MY: mlau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, AHY=rp00650-
dc.identifier.authorityLou, VW=rp00607-
dc.identifier.authorityLum, TYS=rp01513-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, GHY=rp01850-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/geront/gnu106-
dc.identifier.hkuros236002-
dc.identifier.hkuros251212-
dc.identifier.volume54-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 2-
dc.identifier.spage235-
dc.identifier.epage235-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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