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Book Chapter: Who is speaking? Interpreting the voice of the speaker in court

TitleWho is speaking? Interpreting the voice of the speaker in court
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Company
Citation
Who is speaking? Interpreting the voice of the speaker in court. In Schäffner, C., Kredens, K & Fowler, Y (Eds.), Interpreting in a Changing Landscape: Selected papers from Critical Link 6, p. 249-266. Amsterdam: Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examines how interpreters represent the voice of judges and counsel versus that of lay participants in the interpreted talk, using three interpreter-mediated criminal trials from the Hong Kong courts. The findings reveal a consistent shift from direct to reported speech or an omission of first-person reference when interpreting legal professionals’ utterances from English to Chinese – a phenomenon which existing literature does not seem to be able to explain satisfactorily. This study seeks to add a new dimension to the issue and argues that the differentiated interpreting styles may have stemmed from the interpreters’ uneasiness in assuming the voice of the powerful participants due to the power asymmetry in the courtroom. This study also discusses the impact of the interpreting styles on the role of the court interpreter and on the illocutionary force of the speech act.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205370
ISBN
Series/Report no.Benjamins Translation Library; vol. 109

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, ENSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T02:29:20Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T02:29:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationWho is speaking? Interpreting the voice of the speaker in court. In Schäffner, C., Kredens, K & Fowler, Y (Eds.), Interpreting in a Changing Landscape: Selected papers from Critical Link 6, p. 249-266. Amsterdam: Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789027224606-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205370-
dc.description.abstractThis study examines how interpreters represent the voice of judges and counsel versus that of lay participants in the interpreted talk, using three interpreter-mediated criminal trials from the Hong Kong courts. The findings reveal a consistent shift from direct to reported speech or an omission of first-person reference when interpreting legal professionals’ utterances from English to Chinese – a phenomenon which existing literature does not seem to be able to explain satisfactorily. This study seeks to add a new dimension to the issue and argues that the differentiated interpreting styles may have stemmed from the interpreters’ uneasiness in assuming the voice of the powerful participants due to the power asymmetry in the courtroom. This study also discusses the impact of the interpreting styles on the role of the court interpreter and on the illocutionary force of the speech act.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Companyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInterpreting in a Changing Landscape: Selected papers from Critical Link 6-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBenjamins Translation Library; vol. 109-
dc.titleWho is speaking? Interpreting the voice of the speaker in courten_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, ENS: nsng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1075/btl.109.19ng-
dc.identifier.hkuros235599en_US
dc.identifier.spage249en_US
dc.identifier.epage266en_US
dc.publisher.placeAmsterdam: Philadelphiaen_US

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