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Book Chapter: Planning by Contract: Two Dialogues

TitlePlanning by Contract: Two Dialogues
Authors
Keywordseconomics and finance
austrian economics
institutional economics
urban economics
urban and regional studies
Issue Date2013
PublisherEdward Elgar
Citation
Planning by Contract: Two Dialogues. In Andersson, DE & Moroni, S (Eds.), Cities and Private Planning: Property Rights, Entrepreneurship and Transaction Costs, p. 135-152. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractThe first dialogue of this chapter is between a pro-government interventionist planner and a pro-market libertarian planner over the latter’s claim that planning by contract based on the leasehold system as in Hong Kong is a bona fide town-planning regime and that such planning can stand on its own without planning by edict. The libertarian planner attempts to show that planning by contract is truly planning, is self-enforcing and, above all, is capable of meeting both private and public interests. The interventionist planner raises the issue of the public interest in defending state intervention. The second dialogue is between the libertarian planner of the first dialogue and an anarchist libertarian economist over the indispensability of state involvement in town planning. The latter insists that planning can be done by private individuals without any government assistance or direction other than a court. The former explains that planning is the dedication of a certain plot of land to a certain use and is a deliberate human act rather than the outcome of spontaneous, not necessarily deliberative action (in other words an act of man rather than a human act that does not involve thinking or intention); and that prior government involvement is essential for private planning to take place. They conclude by discussing the nature and necessity of government, as a decreasing-cost monopoly of property rights protection for all, in terms of new institutional economics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205303
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, LWCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T02:19:22Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T02:19:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationPlanning by Contract: Two Dialogues. In Andersson, DE & Moroni, S (Eds.), Cities and Private Planning: Property Rights, Entrepreneurship and Transaction Costs, p. 135-152. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781783475056en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205303-
dc.description.abstractThe first dialogue of this chapter is between a pro-government interventionist planner and a pro-market libertarian planner over the latter’s claim that planning by contract based on the leasehold system as in Hong Kong is a bona fide town-planning regime and that such planning can stand on its own without planning by edict. The libertarian planner attempts to show that planning by contract is truly planning, is self-enforcing and, above all, is capable of meeting both private and public interests. The interventionist planner raises the issue of the public interest in defending state intervention. The second dialogue is between the libertarian planner of the first dialogue and an anarchist libertarian economist over the indispensability of state involvement in town planning. The latter insists that planning can be done by private individuals without any government assistance or direction other than a court. The former explains that planning is the dedication of a certain plot of land to a certain use and is a deliberate human act rather than the outcome of spontaneous, not necessarily deliberative action (in other words an act of man rather than a human act that does not involve thinking or intention); and that prior government involvement is essential for private planning to take place. They conclude by discussing the nature and necessity of government, as a decreasing-cost monopoly of property rights protection for all, in terms of new institutional economics.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEdward Elgaren_US
dc.relation.ispartofCities and Private Planning: Property Rights, Entrepreneurship and Transaction Costsen_US
dc.subjecteconomics and finance-
dc.subjectaustrian economics-
dc.subjectinstitutional economics-
dc.subjecturban economics-
dc.subjecturban and regional studies-
dc.titlePlanning by Contract: Two Dialoguesen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, LWC: wclai@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, LWC=rp01004en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4337/9781783475063.00014-
dc.identifier.hkuros236749en_US
dc.identifier.spage135-
dc.identifier.epage152-
dc.publisher.placeCheltenhamen_US

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