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Book Chapter: Bacterial Identification Based on Universal Gene Amplification and Sequencing

TitleBacterial Identification Based on Universal Gene Amplification and Sequencing
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Bacterial Identification Based on Universal Gene Amplification and Sequencing. In Tang, YW & Stratton, CW (Eds.), Advanced Techniques in Diagnostic Microbiology (2nd ed.), p. 483-509. New York: Springer, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractAccurate identification of bacterial isolates is one of the fundamental tasks in clinical microbiology laboratories. This is critical in providing a microbiological diagnosis to an infectious disease and guiding appropriate antibiotic treatment as well as infection control measures. On the population scale, accurate bacterial identification is important for defining epidemiology of infectious diseases. Traditionally, identification of bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories is performed using conventional phenotypic tests, including Gram smear, cultural requirements, growth characteristics, and biochemical tests. These tests are relatively inexpensive and accurate for most commonly encountered bacteria in clinical laboratories. However, in certain circumstances, these phenotypic tests may fail to work and more sophisticated methods may be required. For example, accurate identification of anaerobic bacteria and mycobacteria may require special equipment and expertise such as gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Moreover, phenotypic methods often fail to identify rare bacteria or bacteria which exhibit variable expression of certain traits, and are associated with ambiguity in determining end point reactions. As phenotypic methods rely on the availability of pure culture for the study of growth characteristics and biochemical profiles, it also takes considerable time for slow-growing bacteria to be identified. Furthermore, these methods are not applicable for noncultivable bacteria and in culture-negative infections.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205271
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_US
dc.contributor.authorTeng, LLen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T02:10:18Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T02:10:18Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationBacterial Identification Based on Universal Gene Amplification and Sequencing. In Tang, YW & Stratton, CW (Eds.), Advanced Techniques in Diagnostic Microbiology (2nd ed.), p. 483-509. New York: Springer, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781461439691-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205271-
dc.description.abstractAccurate identification of bacterial isolates is one of the fundamental tasks in clinical microbiology laboratories. This is critical in providing a microbiological diagnosis to an infectious disease and guiding appropriate antibiotic treatment as well as infection control measures. On the population scale, accurate bacterial identification is important for defining epidemiology of infectious diseases. Traditionally, identification of bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories is performed using conventional phenotypic tests, including Gram smear, cultural requirements, growth characteristics, and biochemical tests. These tests are relatively inexpensive and accurate for most commonly encountered bacteria in clinical laboratories. However, in certain circumstances, these phenotypic tests may fail to work and more sophisticated methods may be required. For example, accurate identification of anaerobic bacteria and mycobacteria may require special equipment and expertise such as gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Moreover, phenotypic methods often fail to identify rare bacteria or bacteria which exhibit variable expression of certain traits, and are associated with ambiguity in determining end point reactions. As phenotypic methods rely on the availability of pure culture for the study of growth characteristics and biochemical profiles, it also takes considerable time for slow-growing bacteria to be identified. Furthermore, these methods are not applicable for noncultivable bacteria and in culture-negative infections.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relation.ispartofAdvanced Techniques in Diagnostic Microbiology (2nd ed.)-
dc.titleBacterial Identification Based on Universal Gene Amplification and Sequencingen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP: skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTeng, LL: llteng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_US
dc.identifier.authorityTeng, LL=rp00277en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4614-3970-7_27-
dc.identifier.hkuros239557en_US
dc.identifier.spage483-
dc.identifier.epage509-
dc.publisher.placeNew York-

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