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Conference Paper: Principle of selectivity in housing rehabilitation subsidies: a case study in Hong Kong

TitlePrinciple of selectivity in housing rehabilitation subsidies: a case study in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsUrban renewal
Housing rehabilitation
Subsidies
Dilapidation index
Selectivity
Rationalization
Issue Date2014
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.asce.org/journals/up.html
Citation
The 2013 Pacific Rim Real Estate Society Conference, Melbourne, Australia, 13-16 January 2013. In Journal of Urban Planning and Development, 2014, p. 05014019-1-05014019-10 How to Cite?
AbstractHousing subsidies have to be selective given the tight public budget and need for public accountability. Nevertheless, inappropriately chosen screening criteria can result in inefficient resource allocation. This article attempts to empirically justify the selection or eligibility criteria of subsidy schemes for housing rehabilitation in Hong Kong where urban decay has been an age-old problem. It outlines the development of a statistical model designed to identify determinants of the dilapidation level of housing in the city. Based on the results of a dilapidation assessment on 390 multiowned apartment buildings using the Dilapidation Index, the extent to which the residential buildings under investigation were dilapidated was regressed against the eligibility criteria. The results revealed that older and unmanaged buildings were more derelict, with the development scale and rateable value correlated to the dilapidation level. The article concludes with policy considerations and practical implications. © 2014 American Society of Civil Engineers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205128

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYau, Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, WKen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, DCWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:39:35Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:39:35Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2013 Pacific Rim Real Estate Society Conference, Melbourne, Australia, 13-16 January 2013. In Journal of Urban Planning and Development, 2014, p. 05014019-1-05014019-10en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205128-
dc.description.abstractHousing subsidies have to be selective given the tight public budget and need for public accountability. Nevertheless, inappropriately chosen screening criteria can result in inefficient resource allocation. This article attempts to empirically justify the selection or eligibility criteria of subsidy schemes for housing rehabilitation in Hong Kong where urban decay has been an age-old problem. It outlines the development of a statistical model designed to identify determinants of the dilapidation level of housing in the city. Based on the results of a dilapidation assessment on 390 multiowned apartment buildings using the Dilapidation Index, the extent to which the residential buildings under investigation were dilapidated was regressed against the eligibility criteria. The results revealed that older and unmanaged buildings were more derelict, with the development scale and rateable value correlated to the dilapidation level. The article concludes with policy considerations and practical implications. © 2014 American Society of Civil Engineers.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.asce.org/journals/up.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Urban Planning and Developmenten_US
dc.rightsJournal of Urban Planning and Development. Copyright © American Society of Civil Engineers.-
dc.subjectUrban renewal-
dc.subjectHousing rehabilitation-
dc.subjectSubsidies-
dc.subjectDilapidation index-
dc.subjectSelectivity-
dc.subjectRationalization-
dc.titlePrinciple of selectivity in housing rehabilitation subsidies: a case study in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, DCW: danielho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, DCW=rp01001en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1061/(ASCE)UP.1943-5444.0000231-
dc.identifier.hkuros235409en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros235414-
dc.identifier.spage05014019-1-
dc.identifier.epage05014019-10-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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