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Conference Paper: Unmarried Women With Breast Cancer: Their Psychological Distress and Quality of Life After Treatment

TitleUnmarried Women With Breast Cancer: Their Psychological Distress and Quality of Life After Treatment
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
The 15th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy (IPOS 2013), Rotterdam, Netherlands, 4–8 November 2013. In Psycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 suppl. 3, p. 164-165, abstract no. P1-67 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: According to the World Health Organization in 2008, there were around 7.6 million people died from cancer around the world. More and more women encountered the incidence of breast cancer. Early detection and improvement in breast cancer treatments had contributed to the low breast cancer death rates, however patients gone through cancer treatments may usually experience lots of physical discomfort and psychological distress. The negative affect even lasts after the treatment. METHOD: Pre-test and post-test design had been used in this study. 76 breast cancer patients had been recruited from 2 local hospitals and community cancer support organization. Participants were asked to fill in a set of self-reported questionnaires prior to the commencement of radiotherapy treatment and right after the completion of the treatment. Participant’s radiotherapyrelated symptoms (fatigue, stress, anxiety, depression, pain level and sleep disturbances) and quality of life would be measured. RESULTS: At the baseline measurement, married women scored higher mark in social well-being (FACTB-SWB), functional well-being (FACTB-FWB) and overall quality of life (FACTB) than single women. There was significant difference at baseline (before randomization) in their quality of life between the married women and single women (all ps > 0.05). The posttest measurement (after receiving the radiotherapy treatment), married women still scored significant higher quality of life score than single women. Moreover, single women had lower emotional wellbeing (FACT-EWB) and higher psychosocial distress (PSS). CONCLUSIONS: This research finding is aimed at discussing the psychological characteristics and quality of life among married and unmarried breast cancer patients. Findings showed that unmarried had more negative psychological reactions to the cancer treatment and it affected their quality of life. More than that, single women had higher psychological distress after treatment. It would be a negative influence on their survivorship care. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: The importance of spousal support after breast cancer treatment had been widely studied in the field. However, limited research findings has addressed on the psychological needs of single women. This study may reveal the unique challenges of unmarried women with breast cancer. And how did the cancer treatment affect their social and functional well-being. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: It is very important to provide intensive psychological care to breast cancer patients after treatment. This study may also imply that single women with breast cancer may need more survivorship care after cancer treatment. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF FUNDING: This study is supported by the Research Grants Council General Research Fund (HKU745110H), Hong Kong Cancer Fund, Queen Mary Hospital and Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital.
DescriptionPoster Presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205122
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuk, MYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, HYPen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KPCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:27:34Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:27:34Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 15th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy (IPOS 2013), Rotterdam, Netherlands, 4–8 November 2013. In Psycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 suppl. 3, p. 164-165, abstract no. P1-67en_US
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205122-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: According to the World Health Organization in 2008, there were around 7.6 million people died from cancer around the world. More and more women encountered the incidence of breast cancer. Early detection and improvement in breast cancer treatments had contributed to the low breast cancer death rates, however patients gone through cancer treatments may usually experience lots of physical discomfort and psychological distress. The negative affect even lasts after the treatment. METHOD: Pre-test and post-test design had been used in this study. 76 breast cancer patients had been recruited from 2 local hospitals and community cancer support organization. Participants were asked to fill in a set of self-reported questionnaires prior to the commencement of radiotherapy treatment and right after the completion of the treatment. Participant’s radiotherapyrelated symptoms (fatigue, stress, anxiety, depression, pain level and sleep disturbances) and quality of life would be measured. RESULTS: At the baseline measurement, married women scored higher mark in social well-being (FACTB-SWB), functional well-being (FACTB-FWB) and overall quality of life (FACTB) than single women. There was significant difference at baseline (before randomization) in their quality of life between the married women and single women (all ps > 0.05). The posttest measurement (after receiving the radiotherapy treatment), married women still scored significant higher quality of life score than single women. Moreover, single women had lower emotional wellbeing (FACT-EWB) and higher psychosocial distress (PSS). CONCLUSIONS: This research finding is aimed at discussing the psychological characteristics and quality of life among married and unmarried breast cancer patients. Findings showed that unmarried had more negative psychological reactions to the cancer treatment and it affected their quality of life. More than that, single women had higher psychological distress after treatment. It would be a negative influence on their survivorship care. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: The importance of spousal support after breast cancer treatment had been widely studied in the field. However, limited research findings has addressed on the psychological needs of single women. This study may reveal the unique challenges of unmarried women with breast cancer. And how did the cancer treatment affect their social and functional well-being. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: It is very important to provide intensive psychological care to breast cancer patients after treatment. This study may also imply that single women with breast cancer may need more survivorship care after cancer treatment. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF FUNDING: This study is supported by the Research Grants Council General Research Fund (HKU745110H), Hong Kong Cancer Fund, Queen Mary Hospital and Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_US
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.titleUnmarried Women With Breast Cancer: Their Psychological Distress and Quality of Life After Treatmenten_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KM: irenech@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, HYP: h0205829@hkusua.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1099-1611.2013.3394-
dc.identifier.hkuros240658en_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 3-
dc.identifier.spage164, abstract no. P1-67en_US
dc.identifier.epage165, abstract no. P1-67en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000325687200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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