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Conference Paper: Prenatal factors affecting age at menarche

TitlePrenatal factors affecting age at menarche
Authors
KeywordsBirth control medical sciences
Obstetrics and gynecology
Issue Date2013
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13625187.asp
Citation
The 1st Global Conference on Contraception, Reproductive and Sexual Health, Copenhagen, Denmark, 22-25 May 2013. In The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care, 2013, v. 18 n. S1, p. S94, abstract P007 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: Age at menarche (AAM) is one of the most significant indicators of female sexual maturation. Early AAM may be associated with cancers of the reproductive organs, obesity, diabetes type 2, cardiovascular diseases, infertility and psychological disorders in later life. There are data that some prenatal conditions may contribute to AAM, however, no consensus view on this problem exists. We have systematically reviewed the available literature in order to identify these factors and their relative significance for AAM. METHOD: Using various combinations of keywords, we searched MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases for the data published from 1980 till December 2012. In total 134 articles were retrieved, and 65 of them contained information relevant to our study. RESULTS: The following prenatal factors have been reported as associated with AAM: mother ’ s AAM, weight gain during pregnancy, preeclampsia, birth size, prematurity, environmental hazards exposure during pregnancy. Birth weight and exposure to estrogen-like endocrine disruptors seem to have the most significant effect on AAM. Low birth weight, especially due to intrauterine growth restriction, can lower AAM by 0.5 to 0.8 year through development of insulin resistance and further childhood obesity. Intrauterine exposure to endocrine disruptors can lead to premature puberty and, as a result, early AAM up to one year before the expected age. The data about the effect of maternal smoking on the daughter’s AAM are still inconsistent. Smoking during pregnancy normally leads to in utero growth retardation but the recent studies reported a delay in menarcheal onset despite expected acceleration. Association between AAM and pregnancy complications, alcohol and caffeine prenatal exposure seems are controversial and need further studying. CONCLUSIONS: Better understanding of the association between some prenatal events and early AAM might help to minimise their influence on female pubertal growth.
DescriptionPoster presentation - Topic 1: Adolescent Sexual Reproductive Health Care: P007
This journal suppl. entitled: Book of Abstracts of the First Global Conference on Contraception, Reproductive and Sexual Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205044
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.236
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.576

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYermachenko, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorDvornyk, Ven_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:19:57Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:19:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 1st Global Conference on Contraception, Reproductive and Sexual Health, Copenhagen, Denmark, 22-25 May 2013. In The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care, 2013, v. 18 n. S1, p. S94, abstract P007en_US
dc.identifier.issn1362-5187-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205044-
dc.descriptionPoster presentation - Topic 1: Adolescent Sexual Reproductive Health Care: P007-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Book of Abstracts of the First Global Conference on Contraception, Reproductive and Sexual Health-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Age at menarche (AAM) is one of the most significant indicators of female sexual maturation. Early AAM may be associated with cancers of the reproductive organs, obesity, diabetes type 2, cardiovascular diseases, infertility and psychological disorders in later life. There are data that some prenatal conditions may contribute to AAM, however, no consensus view on this problem exists. We have systematically reviewed the available literature in order to identify these factors and their relative significance for AAM. METHOD: Using various combinations of keywords, we searched MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases for the data published from 1980 till December 2012. In total 134 articles were retrieved, and 65 of them contained information relevant to our study. RESULTS: The following prenatal factors have been reported as associated with AAM: mother ’ s AAM, weight gain during pregnancy, preeclampsia, birth size, prematurity, environmental hazards exposure during pregnancy. Birth weight and exposure to estrogen-like endocrine disruptors seem to have the most significant effect on AAM. Low birth weight, especially due to intrauterine growth restriction, can lower AAM by 0.5 to 0.8 year through development of insulin resistance and further childhood obesity. Intrauterine exposure to endocrine disruptors can lead to premature puberty and, as a result, early AAM up to one year before the expected age. The data about the effect of maternal smoking on the daughter’s AAM are still inconsistent. Smoking during pregnancy normally leads to in utero growth retardation but the recent studies reported a delay in menarcheal onset despite expected acceleration. Association between AAM and pregnancy complications, alcohol and caffeine prenatal exposure seems are controversial and need further studying. CONCLUSIONS: Better understanding of the association between some prenatal events and early AAM might help to minimise their influence on female pubertal growth.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13625187.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Careen_US
dc.rightsThe European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.en_US
dc.subjectBirth control medical sciences-
dc.subjectObstetrics and gynecology-
dc.titlePrenatal factors affecting age at menarcheen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailDvornyk, V: dvornyk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDvornyk, V=rp00693en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/13625187.2013.793038-
dc.identifier.hkuros236968en_US
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issueS1-
dc.identifier.spageS94, abstract P007en_US
dc.identifier.epageS94, abstract P007en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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