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Article: Does the Karate Kid Have a Kung Fu Dream? Hong Kong Martial Arts between Hollywood and Beijing

TitleDoes the Karate Kid Have a Kung Fu Dream? Hong Kong Martial Arts between Hollywood and Beijing
Authors
KeywordsThe Karate Kid
Choreography
Wu shu
Movie fu
Real kung fu
Issue Date2014
PublisherCardiff University, School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/jomec/research/journalsandpublications/jomecjournal/index.html
Citation
JOMEC Journal: Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, 2014, n. 5 How to Cite?
AbstractThis analysis of the martial arts choreography in The Karate Kid (2010) examines the contradictory matrix in which action films produce meanings for global audiences. A remake of a 1984 film, this iteration of The Karate Kid begins its imaginative battle over martial arts turf with English and Chinese titles at odds with one another. For Englishspeaking audiences, the title of the film promises a remake of the popular 1984 story of a displaced Italian American teenager (Ralph Macchio) trained by a Japanese American sensei (Pat Morita) to compete against the local karate bullies. However, the 2010 version has another identity competing with the first. Its Chinese title translates as Kung Fu Dream – Japanese culture, karate, and domestic American class and racial politics out of the picture. In this version, an African American youngster (Jaden Smith) moves to Beijing from Detroit and is taken under the wing of a drunken kung fu master (Jackie Chan) to battle a group of wu shu/san da villains. With the change of choreography comes a shift in the ideological battles taken up by the film’s plot providing a different take on race, class, ethnicity, and geopolitics against the backdrop of the ‘rise’ of China. This essay explores what this shift in martial arts choreography says about the Hollywood, Hong Kong, and Mainland Chinese industries involved in its production. In addition, it explores how fans have come to grips with the depiction of karate, traditional kung fu, PRC-style wu shu, and various screen iterations of a range of martial arts in the film.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204953
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMarchetti, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:14:16Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:14:16Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJOMEC Journal: Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, 2014, n. 5en_US
dc.identifier.issn2049-2340-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204953-
dc.description.abstractThis analysis of the martial arts choreography in The Karate Kid (2010) examines the contradictory matrix in which action films produce meanings for global audiences. A remake of a 1984 film, this iteration of The Karate Kid begins its imaginative battle over martial arts turf with English and Chinese titles at odds with one another. For Englishspeaking audiences, the title of the film promises a remake of the popular 1984 story of a displaced Italian American teenager (Ralph Macchio) trained by a Japanese American sensei (Pat Morita) to compete against the local karate bullies. However, the 2010 version has another identity competing with the first. Its Chinese title translates as Kung Fu Dream – Japanese culture, karate, and domestic American class and racial politics out of the picture. In this version, an African American youngster (Jaden Smith) moves to Beijing from Detroit and is taken under the wing of a drunken kung fu master (Jackie Chan) to battle a group of wu shu/san da villains. With the change of choreography comes a shift in the ideological battles taken up by the film’s plot providing a different take on race, class, ethnicity, and geopolitics against the backdrop of the ‘rise’ of China. This essay explores what this shift in martial arts choreography says about the Hollywood, Hong Kong, and Mainland Chinese industries involved in its production. In addition, it explores how fans have come to grips with the depiction of karate, traditional kung fu, PRC-style wu shu, and various screen iterations of a range of martial arts in the film.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCardiff University, School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/jomec/research/journalsandpublications/jomecjournal/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJOMEC Journal: Journalism, Media and Cultural Studiesen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectThe Karate Kid-
dc.subjectChoreography-
dc.subjectWu shu-
dc.subjectMovie fu-
dc.subjectReal kung fu-
dc.titleDoes the Karate Kid Have a Kung Fu Dream? Hong Kong Martial Arts between Hollywood and Beijingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMarchetti, G: marchett@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMarchetti, G=rp01177en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros238550en_US
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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