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Article: Apolitical Art, Private Experience, and Alternative Subjectivity in China’s Cultural Revolution

TitleApolitical Art, Private Experience, and Alternative Subjectivity in China’s Cultural Revolution
Authors
KeywordsApolitical and private art
China’s Cultural Revolution
Modern self
Subjectivity
Underground culture
Issue Date2014
PublisherCentre d'Etudes Francais sur la Chine Contemporaine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cefc.com.hk/
Citation
China Perspectives, 2014, v. 4 n. Special Issue: Remembering the Mao Era: from popular memory to parallel history, p. 27-36 How to Cite?
AbstractFor a revolution over “culture,” remarkably little has been said about the Cultural Revolution culture itself, and even less about the apolitical, private art produced underground. This article explores this apolitical, private art, arguing that it was a “rebellion of the heart” against the state’s ruthless destruction of the private sphere. Mao’s Party-state drastically fragmented families, moulding socialist subjects through “revolution deep down into the soul.” Paintings of (broken) homes and interiors, flowers, and moonlight articulate lived experiences of the revolution while silently reinventing a private refuge for the body and soul to subsist beyond state control. Defying orthodox revolutionary mass culture, this apolitical art articulated private experience and created a private inner world for a new form of modern subjectivity, while generating community and human solidarity against relentless class struggle and alienation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204946
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, A-
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:13:54Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:13:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationChina Perspectives, 2014, v. 4 n. Special Issue: Remembering the Mao Era: from popular memory to parallel history, p. 27-36-
dc.identifier.issn1011-2006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204946-
dc.description.abstractFor a revolution over “culture,” remarkably little has been said about the Cultural Revolution culture itself, and even less about the apolitical, private art produced underground. This article explores this apolitical, private art, arguing that it was a “rebellion of the heart” against the state’s ruthless destruction of the private sphere. Mao’s Party-state drastically fragmented families, moulding socialist subjects through “revolution deep down into the soul.” Paintings of (broken) homes and interiors, flowers, and moonlight articulate lived experiences of the revolution while silently reinventing a private refuge for the body and soul to subsist beyond state control. Defying orthodox revolutionary mass culture, this apolitical art articulated private experience and created a private inner world for a new form of modern subjectivity, while generating community and human solidarity against relentless class struggle and alienation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCentre d'Etudes Francais sur la Chine Contemporaine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cefc.com.hk/-
dc.relation.ispartofChina Perspectives-
dc.rightsChina Perspectives. Copyright © Centre d'Etudes Francais sur la Chine Contemporaine.-
dc.subjectApolitical and private art-
dc.subjectChina’s Cultural Revolution-
dc.subjectModern self-
dc.subjectSubjectivity-
dc.subjectUnderground culture-
dc.titleApolitical Art, Private Experience, and Alternative Subjectivity in China’s Cultural Revolution-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWang, A: awang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, A=rp01155-
dc.identifier.hkuros238396-
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.issue2014en_US
dc.identifier.spage27-
dc.identifier.epage36-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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