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Article: Phonological representations and early literacy in Chinese

TitlePhonological representations and early literacy in Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Scientific Studies of Reading, 2015, v. 19 n. 2, p. 89-113 How to Cite?
AbstractPhonological processing skills predict early reading development, but what underlies developing phonological processing skills? Phonological representations of 140 native Cantonese-speaking Chinese children (age 4–10) were assessed with speech gating, mispronunciation detection, and nonword repetition tasks; their nonverbal IQ, reading, and phonological processing were assessed with standard tests. Results indicated that even without explicit script-sound correspondence at the phonemic level in Chinese orthography, young Chinese speakers developed representations segmented at this level, and such representations were more fine-grained for older children. Further, the quality of kindergarteners’ phonological representations (specified by sensitivity to mispronunciation in lexical judgment) significantly predicted their emergent reading abilities, and this relation was fully mediated by phonological processing skills, with rapid naming showing the strongest mediation effect. Such mediation was no longer found with the primary-school sample, suggesting plausible developmental changes in the relations between phonological representations, phonological processing, and reading during early reading development.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204910
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKidd, J.C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShum, KMKen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, CSHen_US
dc.contributor.authorAu, TKFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:04:40Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:04:40Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Studies of Reading, 2015, v. 19 n. 2, p. 89-113en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204910-
dc.description.abstractPhonological processing skills predict early reading development, but what underlies developing phonological processing skills? Phonological representations of 140 native Cantonese-speaking Chinese children (age 4–10) were assessed with speech gating, mispronunciation detection, and nonword repetition tasks; their nonverbal IQ, reading, and phonological processing were assessed with standard tests. Results indicated that even without explicit script-sound correspondence at the phonemic level in Chinese orthography, young Chinese speakers developed representations segmented at this level, and such representations were more fine-grained for older children. Further, the quality of kindergarteners’ phonological representations (specified by sensitivity to mispronunciation in lexical judgment) significantly predicted their emergent reading abilities, and this relation was fully mediated by phonological processing skills, with rapid naming showing the strongest mediation effect. Such mediation was no longer found with the primary-school sample, suggesting plausible developmental changes in the relations between phonological representations, phonological processing, and reading during early reading development.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Studies of Readingen_US
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Scientific Studies of Reading on 03 Sep 2014, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10888438.2014.938192-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titlePhonological representations and early literacy in Chineseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, CSH: shhoc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailAu, TKF: terryau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, CSH=rp00631en_US
dc.identifier.authorityAu, TKF=rp00580en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10888438.2014.938192-
dc.identifier.hkuros237119en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000349150700001-

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