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Conference Paper: Common Practices of Australian Speech-Language Pathologists in the Management of Paediatric Vocal Health

TitleCommon Practices of Australian Speech-Language Pathologists in the Management of Paediatric Vocal Health
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe Voice Foundation (VF).
Citation
The 43rd Annual Symposium of the Voice Foundation (VF), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 28 May-1 June, 2014. In the Abstract Book of the 43rd Annual Symposium of the Voice Foundation (VF), 2014, p. abstract no. SLP19 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: This study aimed to determine the common approaches taken by Australian speech language pathologists (SLPs) in the management of paediatric voice caseloads. Methods & Results: Forty-eight Australian SLPs with a current paediatric voice caseload completed an online questionnaire containing 38-items related to assessment, treatment and discharge procedures used in managing a paediatric voice caseload. Paediatric voice comprised between 1-100% of the respondents’ caseloads (M = 8.27%, SD = 17.71). Eight respondents (16.6%) considered themselves to be a voice specialist. Perceptual ratings of voice disorders were used more frequently than instrumental assessment tools throughout the management process. Respondents considered instrumental assessment by an Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) specialist to be important however reported barriers related to ENT service constraints (e.g., ENT availability and long waiting lists) and the associated cost to the client. A range of direct and indirect voice therapy approaches (often in combination) were employed by the respondents, usually determined by client specific factors. Respondents reported that it was more common for patients to be formally discharged (M= 42.32%; SD=41.1) than to self-discharge (M=24.71%; SD=31.78). The most commonly used outcome measures were clinician judgement, pre/post voice recording comparison, and review of results from a follow-up ENT assessment. Quality of life scales were rarely used as outcome measures. The majority of clinicians (56.25%, n = 27/48) indicated that they did not feel confident when managing children with voice disorders, and would welcome further training in the area. Conclusion: This investigation captured current practice of Australian SLPs managing paediatric voice caseloads. This data allows for comparison with management approaches in other countries. The findings highlight a need for further training in this area, particularly to enhance translation of recent research evidence into clinical practice.
DescriptionConference Theme: Care of the Professional Voice
Speech-Language Pathology Session IB
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204903

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFord, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorMadill, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorRumbach, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, EPMen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacBean Hartley, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:04:17Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:04:17Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 43rd Annual Symposium of the Voice Foundation (VF), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 28 May-1 June, 2014. In the Abstract Book of the 43rd Annual Symposium of the Voice Foundation (VF), 2014, p. abstract no. SLP19en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204903-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Care of the Professional Voice-
dc.descriptionSpeech-Language Pathology Session IB-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study aimed to determine the common approaches taken by Australian speech language pathologists (SLPs) in the management of paediatric voice caseloads. Methods & Results: Forty-eight Australian SLPs with a current paediatric voice caseload completed an online questionnaire containing 38-items related to assessment, treatment and discharge procedures used in managing a paediatric voice caseload. Paediatric voice comprised between 1-100% of the respondents’ caseloads (M = 8.27%, SD = 17.71). Eight respondents (16.6%) considered themselves to be a voice specialist. Perceptual ratings of voice disorders were used more frequently than instrumental assessment tools throughout the management process. Respondents considered instrumental assessment by an Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) specialist to be important however reported barriers related to ENT service constraints (e.g., ENT availability and long waiting lists) and the associated cost to the client. A range of direct and indirect voice therapy approaches (often in combination) were employed by the respondents, usually determined by client specific factors. Respondents reported that it was more common for patients to be formally discharged (M= 42.32%; SD=41.1) than to self-discharge (M=24.71%; SD=31.78). The most commonly used outcome measures were clinician judgement, pre/post voice recording comparison, and review of results from a follow-up ENT assessment. Quality of life scales were rarely used as outcome measures. The majority of clinicians (56.25%, n = 27/48) indicated that they did not feel confident when managing children with voice disorders, and would welcome further training in the area. Conclusion: This investigation captured current practice of Australian SLPs managing paediatric voice caseloads. This data allows for comparison with management approaches in other countries. The findings highlight a need for further training in this area, particularly to enhance translation of recent research evidence into clinical practice.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Voice Foundation (VF).-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Symposium of the Voice Foundationen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleCommon Practices of Australian Speech-Language Pathologists in the Management of Paediatric Vocal Healthen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailMa, EPM: estella.ma@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMa, EPM=rp00933en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros238785en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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