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Book Chapter: Teaching Stoichiometry with Particulate Diagrams – Linking Macro Phenomena and Chemical Equations

TitleTeaching Stoichiometry with Particulate Diagrams – Linking Macro Phenomena and Chemical Equations
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Teaching Stoichiometry with Particulate Diagrams – Linking Macro Phenomena and Chemical Equations. In Eilam, B & Gilbert, JK (Eds.), Science Teachers’ Use of Visual Representations, p. 123-143. Cham: Springer, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractThis chapter explores a way stoichiometry is introduced to secondary school students that aims at fostering a conceptual understanding and a relational understanding of the chemistry triplet (i.e. macro, submicro and symbolic). We start by discussing students’ difficulties in understanding macro phenomena, submicro and symbolic representations that are relevant to the learning of stoichiometry. Then we argue that a teaching sequence starting with macro phenomena, then a submicro representation of the corresponding macro phenomena, and finally deriving a chemical equation based on the submicro representation, should be likely to facilitate students’ understanding of stoichiometry. Strategies that guide the selection of a particular macro phenomenon and diagrammatic representation of submicro interactions are proposed. We then analyze a lesson that was conducted based on the design. Particularly, we focus on good practice of teaching with diagrammatic representation of submicro phenomena that served to link macro phenomena and chemical equations as symbolic representations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204872
ISBN
Series/Report no.Models and modeling in science education ; v.8

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, MMWen_US
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, JKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T00:51:20Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T00:51:20Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationTeaching Stoichiometry with Particulate Diagrams – Linking Macro Phenomena and Chemical Equations. In Eilam, B & Gilbert, JK (Eds.), Science Teachers’ Use of Visual Representations, p. 123-143. Cham: Springer, 2014en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9783319065250-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204872-
dc.description.abstractThis chapter explores a way stoichiometry is introduced to secondary school students that aims at fostering a conceptual understanding and a relational understanding of the chemistry triplet (i.e. macro, submicro and symbolic). We start by discussing students’ difficulties in understanding macro phenomena, submicro and symbolic representations that are relevant to the learning of stoichiometry. Then we argue that a teaching sequence starting with macro phenomena, then a submicro representation of the corresponding macro phenomena, and finally deriving a chemical equation based on the submicro representation, should be likely to facilitate students’ understanding of stoichiometry. Strategies that guide the selection of a particular macro phenomenon and diagrammatic representation of submicro interactions are proposed. We then analyze a lesson that was conducted based on the design. Particularly, we focus on good practice of teaching with diagrammatic representation of submicro phenomena that served to link macro phenomena and chemical equations as symbolic representations.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofScience Teachers’ Use of Visual Representationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesModels and modeling in science education ; v.8-
dc.titleTeaching Stoichiometry with Particulate Diagrams – Linking Macro Phenomena and Chemical Equationsen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailCheng, MMW: mwcheng@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, MMW=rp01547en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-06526-7_6en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros238664en_US
dc.identifier.spage123en_US
dc.identifier.epage143en_US
dc.publisher.placeChamen_US

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