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Conference Paper: The battle of microblogging for legal justice in China

TitleThe battle of microblogging for legal justice in China
Authors
KeywordsPublic opinion supervision
China
Blogs
Microblogs
Justice
Internet
Courts
Issue Date2014
PublisherSocial Science Electronic Publishing, Inc..
Citation
The 2014 International Conference on New Media, The Internet, and a Changing China, Pennsylvania, PA., 23-24 January 2014. How to Cite?
AbstractMicroblogging has a special appeal not only to Internet users in China who are keen to voice their opinions in a fast and easy way, but also to Chinese rulers who see microblogging sites as a giant magnetic field for them to tap into and to mold public opinions. In fact, since the 1980s, “public opinion supervision” has been on the agenda of the Chinese Communist Party. Yet, by the time of the 21st century, armed with the Internet, public opinion supervision has evolved into a powerful phenomenon with a life of its own. At its present time, the strange twist of logic is that the press is still tightly controlled by the Community Party but public opinion has been roaming wildly on the Internet, and creeping into the court rooms. To capture the above dynamic, this paper studies the top 20 events discussed in blogs, microblogs and online discussion boards in China between 2008 and 2012, and analyses the extent that public opinion has influenced the investigation and judicial outcome of cases. This article focuses on the intricate relationship between the Party, the judiciary, the Internet and the netizens. It argues that the Internet has transformed public opinion supervision into a form a public opinion monitoring. The prowess of the netizens lies not in their ability to gather information but in being an active power to interpret, to associate and to transform the plight of their fellows into legal narratives. One of the biggest challenges now, perhaps, is to ensure public opinion can be a form of monitoring, untainted by the supervision of the authorities.
DescriptionSession - New Media and China’s Legal System
SSRN Working Paper Series
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204733
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ASYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T00:36:33Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T00:36:33Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 International Conference on New Media, The Internet, and a Changing China, Pennsylvania, PA., 23-24 January 2014.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204733-
dc.descriptionSession - New Media and China’s Legal System-
dc.descriptionSSRN Working Paper Series-
dc.description.abstractMicroblogging has a special appeal not only to Internet users in China who are keen to voice their opinions in a fast and easy way, but also to Chinese rulers who see microblogging sites as a giant magnetic field for them to tap into and to mold public opinions. In fact, since the 1980s, “public opinion supervision” has been on the agenda of the Chinese Communist Party. Yet, by the time of the 21st century, armed with the Internet, public opinion supervision has evolved into a powerful phenomenon with a life of its own. At its present time, the strange twist of logic is that the press is still tightly controlled by the Community Party but public opinion has been roaming wildly on the Internet, and creeping into the court rooms. To capture the above dynamic, this paper studies the top 20 events discussed in blogs, microblogs and online discussion boards in China between 2008 and 2012, and analyses the extent that public opinion has influenced the investigation and judicial outcome of cases. This article focuses on the intricate relationship between the Party, the judiciary, the Internet and the netizens. It argues that the Internet has transformed public opinion supervision into a form a public opinion monitoring. The prowess of the netizens lies not in their ability to gather information but in being an active power to interpret, to associate and to transform the plight of their fellows into legal narratives. One of the biggest challenges now, perhaps, is to ensure public opinion can be a form of monitoring, untainted by the supervision of the authorities.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSocial Science Electronic Publishing, Inc..-
dc.relation.ispartofNew Media, The Internet, and a Changing China International Conference 2014en_US
dc.rights© 2011 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved. For personal & noncommercial use apply only to specific documents and use of specific SSRN-provided statistics and other information.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPublic opinion supervision-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectBlogs-
dc.subjectMicroblogs-
dc.subjectJustice-
dc.subjectInternet-
dc.subjectCourts-
dc.titleThe battle of microblogging for legal justice in Chinaen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, ASY: annechue@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, ASY=rp01243en_US
dc.description.naturepreprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros236823en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.ssrn2397060-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2014/008-

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