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Conference Paper: Does ocular origin of stimuli always help you find a target? It depends!

TitleDoes ocular origin of stimuli always help you find a target? It depends!
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherPion. The Journal's web site is located at http://i-perception.perceptionweb.com/journal/
Citation
The 2014 Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV), Takamatsu, Japan, 19-22 July 2014. In i-Perception, 2014, v. 5 n. 4, p. 355, abstract no. P2-42 How to Cite?
AbstractSalience maps guide attentional deployment. Ocular origin of stimuli has recently been discovered to contribute to salience computation in addition to orientation, luminance and color (Zhaoping, 2008). However, how it interplays with other simple features is little understood. We investigated how ocular origin of stimuli interacts with color and luminance in a visual search task. The search display contained 9 × 9 vertical green bars against a black background (Experiment 1) or dark-grey bars against a mid-grey background (Experiment 2). One randomly selected singleton column was colored red (Experiment 1) or light grey (Experiment 2) in five possible locations. Another column, independently selected, was presented to a different eye (ocular singleton) from the other columns. Observers reported the orientation of a target, a small tilted gap on one of the bars. We found in Experiment 1 that targets congruent with the ocular singleton were slower to be detected than those incongruent with the ocular singleton, but there was no effect on the color-defined singleton. Interestingly, in Experiment 2, we found no effect of ocular origin but the search facilitation for targets overlapped with the luminance singleton. Our findings that the ocular origin of stimuli works distinctly with color and luminance here imply these features are interactively coded during salience computation for visual search.
Descriptionpp. 205-463 of this journal issue contain abstracts of The Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV) 2014
Open Access Journal
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204619
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.813
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.761

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, YSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, HMen_US
dc.contributor.authorTseng, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T00:16:33Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T00:16:33Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV), Takamatsu, Japan, 19-22 July 2014. In i-Perception, 2014, v. 5 n. 4, p. 355, abstract no. P2-42en_US
dc.identifier.issn2041-6695-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204619-
dc.descriptionpp. 205-463 of this journal issue contain abstracts of The Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV) 2014-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.description.abstractSalience maps guide attentional deployment. Ocular origin of stimuli has recently been discovered to contribute to salience computation in addition to orientation, luminance and color (Zhaoping, 2008). However, how it interplays with other simple features is little understood. We investigated how ocular origin of stimuli interacts with color and luminance in a visual search task. The search display contained 9 × 9 vertical green bars against a black background (Experiment 1) or dark-grey bars against a mid-grey background (Experiment 2). One randomly selected singleton column was colored red (Experiment 1) or light grey (Experiment 2) in five possible locations. Another column, independently selected, was presented to a different eye (ocular singleton) from the other columns. Observers reported the orientation of a target, a small tilted gap on one of the bars. We found in Experiment 1 that targets congruent with the ocular singleton were slower to be detected than those incongruent with the ocular singleton, but there was no effect on the color-defined singleton. Interestingly, in Experiment 2, we found no effect of ocular origin but the search facilitation for targets overlapped with the luminance singleton. Our findings that the ocular origin of stimuli works distinctly with color and luminance here imply these features are interactively coded during salience computation for visual search.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPion. The Journal's web site is located at http://i-perception.perceptionweb.com/journal/-
dc.relation.ispartofi-Perceptionen_US
dc.titleDoes ocular origin of stimuli always help you find a target? It depends!en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChow, HM: chmdoris@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTseng, C: tseng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTseng, C=rp00640en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros239138en_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage355en_US
dc.identifier.epage355en_US
dc.publisher.placeLondon-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 140930-

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