File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

Conference Paper: Maternl Axietyacros Pegnacy: Prevalnc, Pternad Rltions Ppartum Anxiety

TitleMaternl Axietyacros Pegnacy: Prevalnc, Pternad Rltions Ppartum Anxiety
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe Marcé Society.
Citation
The 2013 Biennial Conference of the Australasian Chapter of the Marcé Society, Melbourne, Australia, 11-12 October 2013. In Conference Abstracts, 2013, p. 32-33 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Accumulating evidence suggests that pregnancy does not protect women from mental illness. Over the past decades, however, much less research attention in the area of reproductive mental health has been given to anxiety symptoms among pregnant women. The aims of the present study were to determine the prevalence of antenatal anxiety symptoms across different trimesters of pregnancy and examine the effects of antenatal anxiety symptoms on anxiety symptoms in 6-week postpartum. Methodology: A prospective longitudinal design with quantitative approach was adopted. A consecutive sample of 1470 Chinese pregnant women from hospitals in Hong Kong was invited to participate in the study and was assessed using standardized instruments on 4 time points: first trimester, second trimester and third trimester of pregnancy and 6-week postpartum. Results: The prevalence of antenatal anxiety was characterized by a U-shaped curve. The prevalence of anxiety was 17.7% in the first trimester. The rate significantly dropped to 15.5 % in the second trimester but increased significantly again to 16.2% in the third trimester. ANCOVA was used to examine the differences among the groups according to numbers of trimesters in which pregnant women reported elevated levels of antenatal anxiety symptoms on postpartum anxiety symptoms after adjusting for the effects of potential confounders. The difference was significant (F = 3.74, p<.05). Post hoc LSD analysis indicated pregnant women who had elevated levels of anxiety symptoms in all three trimesters reported significantly higher levels of postpartum anxiety symptoms than those who had elevated levels of anxiety in one or two trimesters, and those who did not have elevated anxiety in any trimesters. Discussions: Antenatal anxiety shows a changing course across pregnancy. Those women who had higher levels of anxiety symptoms persistently during the entire antenatal period reported significantly higher levels of postpartum anxiety. These results provide clinical direction suggesting that screening for antenatal anxiety is recommended to be done at antenatal clinic throughout the pregnancy.
DescriptionConference Theme: Perinatal Mental Health: From Conception to Kindergarten. Connecting Research to Clinical Practice
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204420

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, SKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, CPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoh, YWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, CSKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T23:38:55Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T23:38:55Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2013 Biennial Conference of the Australasian Chapter of the Marcé Society, Melbourne, Australia, 11-12 October 2013. In Conference Abstracts, 2013, p. 32-33en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204420-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Perinatal Mental Health: From Conception to Kindergarten. Connecting Research to Clinical Practice-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Accumulating evidence suggests that pregnancy does not protect women from mental illness. Over the past decades, however, much less research attention in the area of reproductive mental health has been given to anxiety symptoms among pregnant women. The aims of the present study were to determine the prevalence of antenatal anxiety symptoms across different trimesters of pregnancy and examine the effects of antenatal anxiety symptoms on anxiety symptoms in 6-week postpartum. Methodology: A prospective longitudinal design with quantitative approach was adopted. A consecutive sample of 1470 Chinese pregnant women from hospitals in Hong Kong was invited to participate in the study and was assessed using standardized instruments on 4 time points: first trimester, second trimester and third trimester of pregnancy and 6-week postpartum. Results: The prevalence of antenatal anxiety was characterized by a U-shaped curve. The prevalence of anxiety was 17.7% in the first trimester. The rate significantly dropped to 15.5 % in the second trimester but increased significantly again to 16.2% in the third trimester. ANCOVA was used to examine the differences among the groups according to numbers of trimesters in which pregnant women reported elevated levels of antenatal anxiety symptoms on postpartum anxiety symptoms after adjusting for the effects of potential confounders. The difference was significant (F = 3.74, p<.05). Post hoc LSD analysis indicated pregnant women who had elevated levels of anxiety symptoms in all three trimesters reported significantly higher levels of postpartum anxiety symptoms than those who had elevated levels of anxiety in one or two trimesters, and those who did not have elevated anxiety in any trimesters. Discussions: Antenatal anxiety shows a changing course across pregnancy. Those women who had higher levels of anxiety symptoms persistently during the entire antenatal period reported significantly higher levels of postpartum anxiety. These results provide clinical direction suggesting that screening for antenatal anxiety is recommended to be done at antenatal clinic throughout the pregnancy.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Marcé Society.-
dc.relation.ispartofBiennial Conference of the Australasian Chapter of the Marcé Societyen_US
dc.titleMaternl Axietyacros Pegnacy: Prevalnc, Pternad Rltions Ppartum Anxietyen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, AM: amlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CY: ayuchan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, CP: chinpeng@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKoh, YW: yvainek@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, AM=rp00483en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, CP=rp01862en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros238982en_US
dc.identifier.spage32-
dc.identifier.epage33-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats