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Conference Paper: Body Mass Index and its Association with Lumbar Disc Herniation and Sciatica: a Large‐Scale, Population‐Based Study

TitleBody Mass Index and its Association with Lumbar Disc Herniation and Sciatica: a Large‐Scale, Population‐Based Study
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS).
Citation
The 41st Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS), Seoul, Korea, 3-7 June 2014. In the Abstract Book of the 41st Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS), 2014, p. 1-2, abstract no. O02 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: Elevated body mass index (BMI) or overweight and obesity are pan‐ demics. Lumbar disc herniation and sciatica occur in every population and present se‐ vere socioeconomic consequences. How‐ ever, little is known regarding the role of BMI with lumbar disc herniation and sciat‐ ica. As such, the following large‐scale study addressed the association of BMI, in partic‐ ular overweight and obesity, with disc her‐ niation, its global lumbar involvement and its implications with the development of sciatica. METHODS: A cross‐sectional study of 2,596 Southern Chinese (mean age: 42 years; 60% females) was conducted assessing T2‐weighted MRI, environmental and lifestyle factors, as well as clinical profiles of sciatica. On imaging, the presence of disc bulge/extrusion (DBE) and other spinal phe‐ notypes from L1‐S1 were assessed. A total DBE (TDBE) Score of L1‐S1 was calculated. Asian‐modified BMI values and categories were obtained of each subject. Results: DBE was noted in 46.3% of the sub‐ jects, mainly occurring at L4‐S1. The mean TDBE score was 0.7. Historical prevalence of sciatica was 44.6%, with 17.9% reporting sciatica at the time of assessment. The mean BMI was 22.9 kg/m2 (7.2% under‐ weight, 47.9% normal‐weight, 36.1% over‐ weight, 8.9% obese). TDBE Score sig‐ nificantly increased with elevated BMI cate‐ gories (p<0.001). Multivariate analyses not‐ ed that elevated BMI was significantly asso‐ ciated with DBE [normal‐weight (Ref); un‐ derweight OR: 0.71(0.49‐1.03); overweight OR: 1.26(1.04‐1.52); obese OR: 1.78(1.30‐ 2.44)]. TDBE score (OR: 1.36; 1.15‐1.60) and obesity (OR: 1.68;1.25‐2.24) were signifi‐ cantly related with sciatica. Worse function‐ al and disability scores were associated with sciatica (p<0.05). DISCUSSION: Based on the largest popula‐ tion‐based study to assess the role of BMI and its association with disc herniation, overweight and obesity significantly in‐ creased the likelihood of having lumbar DBE, its global severity and the risk of de‐ veloping sciatica.
DescriptionOral Presentation
Session#1; Topic: Herniated Disc
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204396

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorKarppinen, JIen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T22:41:36Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T22:41:36Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 41st Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS), Seoul, Korea, 3-7 June 2014. In the Abstract Book of the 41st Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS), 2014, p. 1-2, abstract no. O02en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204396-
dc.descriptionOral Presentation-
dc.descriptionSession#1; Topic: Herniated Disc-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Elevated body mass index (BMI) or overweight and obesity are pan‐ demics. Lumbar disc herniation and sciatica occur in every population and present se‐ vere socioeconomic consequences. How‐ ever, little is known regarding the role of BMI with lumbar disc herniation and sciat‐ ica. As such, the following large‐scale study addressed the association of BMI, in partic‐ ular overweight and obesity, with disc her‐ niation, its global lumbar involvement and its implications with the development of sciatica. METHODS: A cross‐sectional study of 2,596 Southern Chinese (mean age: 42 years; 60% females) was conducted assessing T2‐weighted MRI, environmental and lifestyle factors, as well as clinical profiles of sciatica. On imaging, the presence of disc bulge/extrusion (DBE) and other spinal phe‐ notypes from L1‐S1 were assessed. A total DBE (TDBE) Score of L1‐S1 was calculated. Asian‐modified BMI values and categories were obtained of each subject. Results: DBE was noted in 46.3% of the sub‐ jects, mainly occurring at L4‐S1. The mean TDBE score was 0.7. Historical prevalence of sciatica was 44.6%, with 17.9% reporting sciatica at the time of assessment. The mean BMI was 22.9 kg/m2 (7.2% under‐ weight, 47.9% normal‐weight, 36.1% over‐ weight, 8.9% obese). TDBE Score sig‐ nificantly increased with elevated BMI cate‐ gories (p<0.001). Multivariate analyses not‐ ed that elevated BMI was significantly asso‐ ciated with DBE [normal‐weight (Ref); un‐ derweight OR: 0.71(0.49‐1.03); overweight OR: 1.26(1.04‐1.52); obese OR: 1.78(1.30‐ 2.44)]. TDBE score (OR: 1.36; 1.15‐1.60) and obesity (OR: 1.68;1.25‐2.24) were signifi‐ cantly related with sciatica. Worse function‐ al and disability scores were associated with sciatica (p<0.05). DISCUSSION: Based on the largest popula‐ tion‐based study to assess the role of BMI and its association with disc herniation, overweight and obesity significantly in‐ creased the likelihood of having lumbar DBE, its global severity and the risk of de‐ veloping sciatica.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS).-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS)en_US
dc.titleBody Mass Index and its Association with Lumbar Disc Herniation and Sciatica: a Large‐Scale, Population‐Based Studyen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hrmoldk@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros238051en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros237072-
dc.identifier.spage1, abstract no. O02-
dc.identifier.epage2, abstract no. O02-
dc.publisher.placeSeoul, Koreaen_US

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