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Conference Paper: Heterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Replacement. Is It an Issue?

TitleHeterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Replacement. Is It an Issue?
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.
Citation
The 33rd Annual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA), Hong Kong, China, 23-24 November 2013. In the Abstracts of the 33rd Annual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA), 2013, p. 80, abstract no. 9.11 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Heterotopic ossification after total knee arthroplasty is a less frequently studied topic in contrast to after total hip arthroplasty. Its incidence in the western literature ranged from 1 to 42% but the incidence in a Chinese population is largely unknown. The significance and effects on the outcome of the surgery also remain controversial. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all total knee arthroplasties performed in a local hospital from January 2009 to December 2010. Revision surgeries were excluded. The patients were assessed clinically on follow-up for range of motion of the knee and the most recent postoperative X-rays were studied for the presence of heterotopic ossification. Results: A total of 413 primary total knee arthroplasties were performed during the study period on 371 patients. The mean follow-up time was 44 months. The incidence of heterotopic ossification was 15.7%. The majority of which were located at the suprapatellar pouch (35%) or along the medial gutter (42%). Increase in size of the heterotopic ossification was not associated with reduced gains in the range of motion of the knee. Discussion and Conclusion: Heterotopic ossification after total knee arthroplasty is not an uncommon condition in the Chinese population. It was previously thought to occur mainly at the suprapatellar pouch, but our study showed that the medial gutter was the most common location. However, its presence did not appear to impact negatively on the range of motion of the knee on follow-up.
DescriptionConference Theme: Defying the Aging Spine
Concurrent Free Papers 9: Hips and Knees II
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204339

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYau, RCHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, PKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChiu, PKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYan, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, FYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T22:41:16Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T22:41:16Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 33rd Annual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA), Hong Kong, China, 23-24 November 2013. In the Abstracts of the 33rd Annual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA), 2013, p. 80, abstract no. 9.11en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204339-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Defying the Aging Spine-
dc.descriptionConcurrent Free Papers 9: Hips and Knees II-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Heterotopic ossification after total knee arthroplasty is a less frequently studied topic in contrast to after total hip arthroplasty. Its incidence in the western literature ranged from 1 to 42% but the incidence in a Chinese population is largely unknown. The significance and effects on the outcome of the surgery also remain controversial. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all total knee arthroplasties performed in a local hospital from January 2009 to December 2010. Revision surgeries were excluded. The patients were assessed clinically on follow-up for range of motion of the knee and the most recent postoperative X-rays were studied for the presence of heterotopic ossification. Results: A total of 413 primary total knee arthroplasties were performed during the study period on 371 patients. The mean follow-up time was 44 months. The incidence of heterotopic ossification was 15.7%. The majority of which were located at the suprapatellar pouch (35%) or along the medial gutter (42%). Increase in size of the heterotopic ossification was not associated with reduced gains in the range of motion of the knee. Discussion and Conclusion: Heterotopic ossification after total knee arthroplasty is not an uncommon condition in the Chinese population. It was previously thought to occur mainly at the suprapatellar pouch, but our study showed that the medial gutter was the most common location. However, its presence did not appear to impact negatively on the range of motion of the knee on follow-up.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA)en_US
dc.rightsAnnual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA). Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.titleHeterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Replacement. Is It an Issue?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, PK: cpk464@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChiu, PKY: pkychiu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYan, CH: yanchoi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, FY: fyng@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, PKY=rp00379en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYan, CH=rp00303en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros235787en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros240372-
dc.identifier.spage80, abstract no. 9.11en_US
dc.identifier.epage80, abstract no. 9.11en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong, China-

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