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Conference Paper: Cephalometric norms of the upper airway of Chinese children and the association between airway dimensions and craniofacial structures

TitleCephalometric norms of the upper airway of Chinese children and the association between airway dimensions and craniofacial structures
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Dentistry
Issue Date2014
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ejo.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
The 90th Congress of the European Orthodontic Society (EOS), Warsaw, Poland, 18-22 June 2014. In European Journal of Orthodontics, 2014, v. 36 n. 5, p. e98 Abstract no. 184 How to Cite?
AbstractAIM: To retrospectively establish cephalometric norms of the upper airway for Chinese children, and to determine association between airway dimensions and craniofacial features. SUBJECTS AND METHOD: A random sample of 224 male and 201 female 12-year-old southern Chinese children, for whom lateral cephalograms were available. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze 11 key cephalometric parameters for airway dimensions and 29 parameters for craniofacial features. Gender difference of airway dimensions was analyzed using two-sample t-test. The subjects were further divided into four subgroups according to ANB angle (Class I, mild Class II, severe Class II or Class III) and three subgroups according to the intermaxillary angle (low, normal or high angle), respectively. Association between airway parameters and ANB angle class and intermaxillary angle class was analyzed with analysis of variance. Pearson’s correlation analysis was computed to determine correlations between airway and craniofacial parameters. RESULTS: Significant differences were found in the high angle subgroup in the vertical position of the hyoid bone (P < 0.01), retroglossal pharyngeal depth (P < 0.05) and soft palatal angle (P < 0.001) compared with the other two intermaxillary angle class subgroups. A moderate correlation (r > 0.5) between airway dimensions and craniofacial features was evident in the severe Class II subgroups (ANB >7°). Of note there was a strong correlation (r > 0.7) between mandibular length (Cd-Gn) and the vertical position of hyoid bone and a moderate correlation (r > 0.6) between mandibular length and the sagittal position of hyoid bone. CONCLUSION: Cephalometric norms of the upper airway for Chinese children have been established with gender-specific standards. High angle subjects tend to have a lower positioned hyoid bone and a narrow retroglossal airway. In severe Class II subjects, mandibular length is correlated with the position of hyoid bone in both the vertical and sagittal dimensions.
DescriptionOral Presentation: no. 184
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203666
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.44
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.090

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGu, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, RWKen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagg, Uen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T15:58:21Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T15:58:21Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 90th Congress of the European Orthodontic Society (EOS), Warsaw, Poland, 18-22 June 2014. In European Journal of Orthodontics, 2014, v. 36 n. 5, p. e98 Abstract no. 184en_US
dc.identifier.issn0141-5387-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203666-
dc.descriptionOral Presentation: no. 184-
dc.description.abstractAIM: To retrospectively establish cephalometric norms of the upper airway for Chinese children, and to determine association between airway dimensions and craniofacial features. SUBJECTS AND METHOD: A random sample of 224 male and 201 female 12-year-old southern Chinese children, for whom lateral cephalograms were available. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze 11 key cephalometric parameters for airway dimensions and 29 parameters for craniofacial features. Gender difference of airway dimensions was analyzed using two-sample t-test. The subjects were further divided into four subgroups according to ANB angle (Class I, mild Class II, severe Class II or Class III) and three subgroups according to the intermaxillary angle (low, normal or high angle), respectively. Association between airway parameters and ANB angle class and intermaxillary angle class was analyzed with analysis of variance. Pearson’s correlation analysis was computed to determine correlations between airway and craniofacial parameters. RESULTS: Significant differences were found in the high angle subgroup in the vertical position of the hyoid bone (P < 0.01), retroglossal pharyngeal depth (P < 0.05) and soft palatal angle (P < 0.001) compared with the other two intermaxillary angle class subgroups. A moderate correlation (r > 0.5) between airway dimensions and craniofacial features was evident in the severe Class II subgroups (ANB >7°). Of note there was a strong correlation (r > 0.7) between mandibular length (Cd-Gn) and the vertical position of hyoid bone and a moderate correlation (r > 0.6) between mandibular length and the sagittal position of hyoid bone. CONCLUSION: Cephalometric norms of the upper airway for Chinese children have been established with gender-specific standards. High angle subjects tend to have a lower positioned hyoid bone and a narrow retroglossal airway. In severe Class II subjects, mandibular length is correlated with the position of hyoid bone in both the vertical and sagittal dimensions.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ejo.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean journal of Orthodonticsen_US
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectDentistry-
dc.titleCephalometric norms of the upper airway of Chinese children and the association between airway dimensions and craniofacial structuresen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailGu, M: drgumin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, Y: yangyanq@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, RWK: fyoung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHagg, U: euohagg@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGu, M=rp01892en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYang, Y=rp00045en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, RWK=rp00038en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagg, U=rp00020en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ejo/cju057-
dc.identifier.hkuros235272en_US
dc.identifier.spagee98-
dc.identifier.epagee98-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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