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Article: Capturing the two dimensions of residential segregation at the neighborhood level for health research

TitleCapturing the two dimensions of residential segregation at the neighborhood level for health research
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/Public_Health
Citation
Frontiers in Public Health, 2014, v. 2, article no. 118 How to Cite?
AbstractTwo conceptual and methodological foundations of segregation studies are that (i) segregation involves more than one group, and (ii) segregation measures need to quantify how different population groups are distributed across space. Therefore, percentage of population belonging to a group is not an appropriate measure of segregation because it does not describe how populations are spread across different areal units or neighborhoods. In principle, evenness and isolation are the two distinct dimensions of segregation that capture the spatial patterns of population groups. To portray people’s daily environment more accurately, segregation measures need to account for the spatial relationships between areal units and to reflect the situations at the neighborhood scale. For these reasons, the use of local spatial entropy-based diversity index (SHi) and local spatial isolation index (Si) to capture the evenness and isolation dimensions of segregation, respectively, are preferable. However, these two local spatial segregation indexes have rarely been incorporated into health research. Rather ineffective and insufficient segregation measures have been used in previous studies. Hence, this paper empirically demonstrates how the two measures can reflect the two distinct dimensions of segregation at the neighborhood level, and argues conceptually and set the stage for their future use to effectively and meaningfully examine the relationships between residential segregation and health.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203569
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOka, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, WSDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T15:28:05Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T15:28:05Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Public Health, 2014, v. 2, article no. 118en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203569-
dc.description.abstractTwo conceptual and methodological foundations of segregation studies are that (i) segregation involves more than one group, and (ii) segregation measures need to quantify how different population groups are distributed across space. Therefore, percentage of population belonging to a group is not an appropriate measure of segregation because it does not describe how populations are spread across different areal units or neighborhoods. In principle, evenness and isolation are the two distinct dimensions of segregation that capture the spatial patterns of population groups. To portray people’s daily environment more accurately, segregation measures need to account for the spatial relationships between areal units and to reflect the situations at the neighborhood scale. For these reasons, the use of local spatial entropy-based diversity index (SHi) and local spatial isolation index (Si) to capture the evenness and isolation dimensions of segregation, respectively, are preferable. However, these two local spatial segregation indexes have rarely been incorporated into health research. Rather ineffective and insufficient segregation measures have been used in previous studies. Hence, this paper empirically demonstrates how the two measures can reflect the two distinct dimensions of segregation at the neighborhood level, and argues conceptually and set the stage for their future use to effectively and meaningfully examine the relationships between residential segregation and health.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/Public_Health-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Public Healthen_US
dc.rightsThis Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleCapturing the two dimensions of residential segregation at the neighborhood level for health researchen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, WSD: dwong2@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WSD=rp01814en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpubh.2014.00118-
dc.identifier.pmid25202687-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4142636-
dc.identifier.hkuros238444en_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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