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Article: Long-term relationship between climate change and nomadic migration in historical China

TitleLong-term relationship between climate change and nomadic migration in historical China
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Ecology and Society, 2014, v. 19 n. 2, article no. 68 How to Cite?
AbstractWe investigated the relationship between a 2000-year history of nomadic migration and climate change in historical China. By using updated data and statistical methods, the study solved several unanswered questions from past research about the relationship between climate change and the nomadic migration, especially over the long term and on a large spatial scale. The study used correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis, and Granger causality analysis to quantitatively verify the following causal pathway: climate change → nomadic migration → conflicts between pastoralists and agriculturalists. In the long term, precipitation was a statistically more influential factor on nomadic migration than temperature in historical China. How climate change affects the migration of nomadic minorities in the long term is theoretically explained based on the Push-Pull model as well as statistical evidence.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203561

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPei, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T15:28:02Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T15:28:02Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationEcology and Society, 2014, v. 19 n. 2, article no. 68en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203561-
dc.description.abstractWe investigated the relationship between a 2000-year history of nomadic migration and climate change in historical China. By using updated data and statistical methods, the study solved several unanswered questions from past research about the relationship between climate change and the nomadic migration, especially over the long term and on a large spatial scale. The study used correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis, and Granger causality analysis to quantitatively verify the following causal pathway: climate change → nomadic migration → conflicts between pastoralists and agriculturalists. In the long term, precipitation was a statistically more influential factor on nomadic migration than temperature in historical China. How climate change affects the migration of nomadic minorities in the long term is theoretically explained based on the Push-Pull model as well as statistical evidence.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEcology and Societyen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleLong-term relationship between climate change and nomadic migration in historical Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPei, Q: peiqing@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, D: zhangd@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, D=rp00649en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5751/ES-06528-190268en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros235650en_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 68en_US
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 68en_US

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