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Article: When does playing hard to get increase romantic attraction?

TitleWhen does playing hard to get increase romantic attraction?
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 2014, v. 143, p. 521-526 How to Cite?
AbstractFolk wisdom suggests playing hard to get is an effective strategy in romantic attraction. However, prior research has yielded little support for this belief. This article seeks to reconcile these contrasting views by investigating how 2 hitherto unconsidered factors, (a) the asymmetry between wanting (motivational) and liking (affective) responses and (b) the degree of psychological commitment, can determine the efficacy of playing hard to get. We propose that person B playing hard to get with person A will simultaneously increase A’s wanting but decrease A’s liking of B. However, such a result will only occur if A is psychologically committed to pursuing further relations with B; otherwise, playing hard to get will decrease both wanting and liking. Two studies confirm these propositions. We discuss implications for interpersonal attraction and the interplay between emotion and motivation in determining preferences.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203548

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDai, XCen_US
dc.contributor.authorDong, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorJia, SJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T15:27:01Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T15:27:01Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Experimental Psychology: General, 2014, v. 143, p. 521-526en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203548-
dc.description.abstractFolk wisdom suggests playing hard to get is an effective strategy in romantic attraction. However, prior research has yielded little support for this belief. This article seeks to reconcile these contrasting views by investigating how 2 hitherto unconsidered factors, (a) the asymmetry between wanting (motivational) and liking (affective) responses and (b) the degree of psychological commitment, can determine the efficacy of playing hard to get. We propose that person B playing hard to get with person A will simultaneously increase A’s wanting but decrease A’s liking of B. However, such a result will only occur if A is psychologically committed to pursuing further relations with B; otherwise, playing hard to get will decrease both wanting and liking. Two studies confirm these propositions. We discuss implications for interpersonal attraction and the interplay between emotion and motivation in determining preferences.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Experimental Psychology: Generalen_US
dc.titleWhen does playing hard to get increase romantic attraction?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJia, SJ: jjia@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJia, SJ=rp01801en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0032989en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros238072en_US
dc.identifier.volume143en_US
dc.identifier.spage521en_US
dc.identifier.epage526en_US

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