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Article: Marital transfers and the welfare of women

TitleMarital transfers and the welfare of women
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Oxford Economic Papers, 2014, v. 66 n. 4, p. 1019-1041 How to Cite?
AbstractThroughout history, marriage has often been accompanied by substantial exchange of wealth. My earlier works suggested that dowry can be interpreted as a pre-mortem bequest by a woman's parents to help establish her position and safeguard her welfare in the new conjugal household. This hypothesis is, however, inconsistent with the dominant view in India, where inflating dowry is considered responsible for the plights of many women. Despite these divergent views, recent studies suggested that dowry is not a homogeneous transfer, but a combination of different transactions. In this paper, I use a survey data set from India to decompose the transfer into various components, and identify their effects on the status of the wife. It is found that a larger transfer from the bride's parents to the bride will enhance her decision-making role. This suggests an outright ban on dowry may not necessarily serve the interest of Indian women.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203530

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Wen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T15:25:46Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T15:25:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationOxford Economic Papers, 2014, v. 66 n. 4, p. 1019-1041en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203530-
dc.description.abstractThroughout history, marriage has often been accompanied by substantial exchange of wealth. My earlier works suggested that dowry can be interpreted as a pre-mortem bequest by a woman's parents to help establish her position and safeguard her welfare in the new conjugal household. This hypothesis is, however, inconsistent with the dominant view in India, where inflating dowry is considered responsible for the plights of many women. Despite these divergent views, recent studies suggested that dowry is not a homogeneous transfer, but a combination of different transactions. In this paper, I use a survey data set from India to decompose the transfer into various components, and identify their effects on the status of the wife. It is found that a larger transfer from the bride's parents to the bride will enhance her decision-making role. This suggests an outright ban on dowry may not necessarily serve the interest of Indian women.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofOxford Economic Papersen_US
dc.titleMarital transfers and the welfare of womenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, W: wchan@econ.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, W=rp01049en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/oep/gpu023en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros237831en_US

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