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Article: The influence of ground rules on Chinese students’ learning of critical thinking in group work: a cultural perspective

TitleThe influence of ground rules on Chinese students’ learning of critical thinking in group work: a cultural perspective
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherTaylor & Francis.
Citation
Pedagogy, Culture & Society, 2013, v. 22, p. 337-368 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article reports the results of a one-year longitudinal study examining a teaching intervention designed to enhance students’ learning of critical thinking in Hong Kong. Seventy participating students (age 16-18) learned how to make reasoned arguments through a series of collaborative activities, including critical-thinking modelling tasks and group debate. Of particular interest was the role of Chinese traditional values in the students’ perceptions of ground rules and the potential influence those rules had on their learning of critical thinking in debate-type discussions. The findings show that Confucian beliefs, such as Li (ritual, ‘禮’) and Chi (shame or ‘face disgrace’, ‘恥’), do influence Chinese students’ understanding of ground rules. Follow-up analysis revealed positive correlations between the establishment of these rules and students’ demonstration of critical-thinking abilities. The results thus refute previous scholars’ criticism of the use of ground rules in classroom talk.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203474

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFung, CLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T15:16:52Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T15:16:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationPedagogy, Culture & Society, 2013, v. 22, p. 337-368en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203474-
dc.description.abstractThis article reports the results of a one-year longitudinal study examining a teaching intervention designed to enhance students’ learning of critical thinking in Hong Kong. Seventy participating students (age 16-18) learned how to make reasoned arguments through a series of collaborative activities, including critical-thinking modelling tasks and group debate. Of particular interest was the role of Chinese traditional values in the students’ perceptions of ground rules and the potential influence those rules had on their learning of critical thinking in debate-type discussions. The findings show that Confucian beliefs, such as Li (ritual, ‘禮’) and Chi (shame or ‘face disgrace’, ‘恥’), do influence Chinese students’ understanding of ground rules. Follow-up analysis revealed positive correlations between the establishment of these rules and students’ demonstration of critical-thinking abilities. The results thus refute previous scholars’ criticism of the use of ground rules in classroom talk.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofPedagogy, Culture & Societyen_US
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT ‘This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.en_US
dc.titleThe influence of ground rules on Chinese students’ learning of critical thinking in group work: a cultural perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFung, CL: clfung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFung, CL=rp01655en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14681366.2014.899611en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros237912en_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.spage337en_US
dc.identifier.epage368en_US

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