File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Ionizing radiation exposure and the development of soft-tissue sarcomas in atomic-bomb survivors

TitleIonizing radiation exposure and the development of soft-tissue sarcomas in atomic-bomb survivors
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jbjs.org
Citation
Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery: American Volume, 2013, v. 95 n. 3, p. 222-229 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Very high levels of ionizing radiation exposure have been associated with the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. The effects of lower levels of ionizing radiation on sarcoma development are unknown. This study addressed the role of low to moderately high levels of ionizing radiation exposure in the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. METHODS: Based on the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, 80,180 individuals were prospectively assessed for the development of primary soft-tissue sarcoma. Colon dose in gray (Gy), the excess relative risk, and the excess absolute rate per Gy absorbed ionizing radiation dose were assessed. Subject demographic, age-specific, and survival parameters were evaluated. RESULTS: One hundred and four soft-tissue sarcomas were identified (mean colon dose = 0.18 Gy), associated with a 39% five-year survival rate. Mean ages at the time of the bombings and sarcoma diagnosis were 26.8 and 63.6 years, respectively. A linear dose-response model with an excess relative risk of 1.01 per Gy (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.13 to 2.46; p = 0.019) and an excess absolute risk per Gy of 4.3 per 100,000 persons per year (95% CI: 1.1 to 8.9; p = 0.001) were noted in the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the largest and longest studies (fifty-six years from the time of exposure to the time of follow-up) to assess ionizing radiation effects on the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. This is the first study to suggest that lower levels of ionizing radiation may be associated with the development of soft-tissue sarcoma, with exposure of 1 Gy doubling the risk of soft-tissue sarcoma development (linear dose-response). The five-year survival rate of patients with soft-tissue sarcoma in this population was much lower than that reported elsewhere.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203235
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.163
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.938
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorNishi, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorCologne, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorFunamoto, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayashi, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorKodama, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorMiles, EFen_US
dc.contributor.authorSuyama, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSoda, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorKasagi, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T13:11:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T13:11:19Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery: American Volume, 2013, v. 95 n. 3, p. 222-229en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9355en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203235-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Very high levels of ionizing radiation exposure have been associated with the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. The effects of lower levels of ionizing radiation on sarcoma development are unknown. This study addressed the role of low to moderately high levels of ionizing radiation exposure in the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. METHODS: Based on the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, 80,180 individuals were prospectively assessed for the development of primary soft-tissue sarcoma. Colon dose in gray (Gy), the excess relative risk, and the excess absolute rate per Gy absorbed ionizing radiation dose were assessed. Subject demographic, age-specific, and survival parameters were evaluated. RESULTS: One hundred and four soft-tissue sarcomas were identified (mean colon dose = 0.18 Gy), associated with a 39% five-year survival rate. Mean ages at the time of the bombings and sarcoma diagnosis were 26.8 and 63.6 years, respectively. A linear dose-response model with an excess relative risk of 1.01 per Gy (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.13 to 2.46; p = 0.019) and an excess absolute risk per Gy of 4.3 per 100,000 persons per year (95% CI: 1.1 to 8.9; p = 0.001) were noted in the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the largest and longest studies (fifty-six years from the time of exposure to the time of follow-up) to assess ionizing radiation effects on the development of soft-tissue sarcoma. This is the first study to suggest that lower levels of ionizing radiation may be associated with the development of soft-tissue sarcoma, with exposure of 1 Gy doubling the risk of soft-tissue sarcoma development (linear dose-response). The five-year survival rate of patients with soft-tissue sarcoma in this population was much lower than that reported elsewhere.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jbjs.org-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery: American Volumeen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery: American Volume. Copyright © Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleIonizing radiation exposure and the development of soft-tissue sarcomas in atomic-bomb survivorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.2106/JBJS.L.00546en_US
dc.identifier.pmid23389785-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84873888663-
dc.identifier.hkuros237990en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros210532-
dc.identifier.volume95en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage222en_US
dc.identifier.epage9en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000334896900005-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats