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Article: Pore-pressure generation and fluidization in a loess landslide triggered by the 1920 Haiyuan Earthquake, China: A case study

TitlePore-pressure generation and fluidization in a loess landslide triggered by the 1920 Haiyuan Earthquake, China: A case study
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Engineering Geology, 2014, v. 174, p. 36-45 How to Cite?
AbstractDuring the 1920 Haiyuan earthquake, numerous catastrophic landslides were triggered in the loess area in Northwest China. We investigated in detail a large example of these landslides, referred to as Dangjiacha landslide in this paper. This landslide originated from a slope of about 20°, and the displaced soil mass traveled about 3200. m, damming a valley. We performed a field survey and found that standing water existed in the landslide area and the loess had high porosity. We infer that it was the liquefaction of the water-saturated loess layer rather than the suspension of silt in the pore-air in the loess that caused the great mobility of this landslide. To test this inference, we performed undrained triaxial compression and ring shear tests on loess samples to examine the shear behavior of loess saturated by either air or water. The test results showed that the water-saturated loess soil was highly susceptible to flow liquefaction failure. Fast shear tests on naturally air-dried loess samples revealed that the generated pore-air pressure was small under the "undrained condition" and no significant reduction in the shear resistance was observed, implying that air entrapped in the loess was unlikely to be the main contributor to the high mobility of this large-scale landslide. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202669
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.196
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.810
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorFuruya, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T09:14:14Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T09:14:14Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationEngineering Geology, 2014, v. 174, p. 36-45en_US
dc.identifier.issn00137952-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202669-
dc.description.abstractDuring the 1920 Haiyuan earthquake, numerous catastrophic landslides were triggered in the loess area in Northwest China. We investigated in detail a large example of these landslides, referred to as Dangjiacha landslide in this paper. This landslide originated from a slope of about 20°, and the displaced soil mass traveled about 3200. m, damming a valley. We performed a field survey and found that standing water existed in the landslide area and the loess had high porosity. We infer that it was the liquefaction of the water-saturated loess layer rather than the suspension of silt in the pore-air in the loess that caused the great mobility of this landslide. To test this inference, we performed undrained triaxial compression and ring shear tests on loess samples to examine the shear behavior of loess saturated by either air or water. The test results showed that the water-saturated loess soil was highly susceptible to flow liquefaction failure. Fast shear tests on naturally air-dried loess samples revealed that the generated pore-air pressure was small under the "undrained condition" and no significant reduction in the shear resistance was observed, implying that air entrapped in the loess was unlikely to be the main contributor to the high mobility of this large-scale landslide. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEngineering Geologyen_US
dc.titlePore-pressure generation and fluidization in a loess landslide triggered by the 1920 Haiyuan Earthquake, China: A case studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, J: junyang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYang, J=rp00201en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.enggeo.2014.03.006-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84897495108-
dc.identifier.hkuros236357en_US
dc.identifier.volume174en_US
dc.identifier.spage36en_US
dc.identifier.epage45en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000335630500004-

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