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Article: Failure modes of sand in undrained cyclic loading: impact of sample preparation

TitleFailure modes of sand in undrained cyclic loading: impact of sample preparation
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, ASCE, 2014, v. 140 n. 1, p. 152-169 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper presents a systematic experimental investigation into the impact of specimen preparation on the cyclic loading behavior of saturated sand, including the deformation pattern, pore-water pressure generation, stress-strain relationship, and cyclic shear strength. Moist tamping and dry deposition were used in the laboratory to prepare sand specimens with distinct fabrics for cyclic triaxial tests under a range of conditions. It is found that the soil fabric formed by dry deposition can lead to unique failure modes different from those of moist-tamped samples in certain situations. These failure modes are hybrid in nature, characterized by a contractive response in the form of limited flow followed by cyclic strain hardening in the form of either cyclic mobility or plastic-strain accumulation. The hybrid nature of the failure patterns makes defining failure for liquefaction-resistance evaluation crucial; the conventional failure criteria based on a certain level of strain or pore-water pressure do not appear to properly represent the failure mechanism involved and may lead to a substantial overestimation of liquefaction resistance. The experiments reveal that the method used to reconstitute specimens or the soil fabric they form plays a role that is far more complicated than previously thought. Depending on the combination of relative density, confining stress, and degree of stress reversal in cyclic loading, a change of reconstitution method can have a marked or little effect on the nature of the response in terms of deformation pattern and failure mechanism; nevertheless, the two reconstitution methods always give significantly different liquefaction-resistance values under otherwise similar testing conditions. © 2014 American Society of Civil Engineers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202668
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.696
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.344
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSze, HYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T09:14:14Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T09:14:14Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, ASCE, 2014, v. 140 n. 1, p. 152-169en_US
dc.identifier.issn10900241-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202668-
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents a systematic experimental investigation into the impact of specimen preparation on the cyclic loading behavior of saturated sand, including the deformation pattern, pore-water pressure generation, stress-strain relationship, and cyclic shear strength. Moist tamping and dry deposition were used in the laboratory to prepare sand specimens with distinct fabrics for cyclic triaxial tests under a range of conditions. It is found that the soil fabric formed by dry deposition can lead to unique failure modes different from those of moist-tamped samples in certain situations. These failure modes are hybrid in nature, characterized by a contractive response in the form of limited flow followed by cyclic strain hardening in the form of either cyclic mobility or plastic-strain accumulation. The hybrid nature of the failure patterns makes defining failure for liquefaction-resistance evaluation crucial; the conventional failure criteria based on a certain level of strain or pore-water pressure do not appear to properly represent the failure mechanism involved and may lead to a substantial overestimation of liquefaction resistance. The experiments reveal that the method used to reconstitute specimens or the soil fabric they form plays a role that is far more complicated than previously thought. Depending on the combination of relative density, confining stress, and degree of stress reversal in cyclic loading, a change of reconstitution method can have a marked or little effect on the nature of the response in terms of deformation pattern and failure mechanism; nevertheless, the two reconstitution methods always give significantly different liquefaction-resistance values under otherwise similar testing conditions. © 2014 American Society of Civil Engineers.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, ASCEen_US
dc.titleFailure modes of sand in undrained cyclic loading: impact of sample preparationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSze, HY: szehy@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, J: junyang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYang, J=rp00201en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606.0000971-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84891080113-
dc.identifier.hkuros236355en_US
dc.identifier.volume140en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage152en_US
dc.identifier.epage169en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000328556900013-

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