File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Acupuncture for depression: A review of clinical applications

TitleAcupuncture for depression: A review of clinical applications
Authors
KeywordsAdverse events
Nonresponse
Effectiveness
Depression
Augmentation
Antidepressants
Acupuncture
Side effect
Issue Date2012
Citation
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 2012, v. 57, n. 7, p. 397-405 How to Cite?
AbstractWhile increasing numbers of patients are seeking acupuncture treatment for depression in recent years, there is limited evidence of the antidepressant (AD) effectiveness of acupuncture. Given the unsatisfactory response rates of many Food and Drug Administration-approved ADs, research on acupuncture remains of potential value. Therefore, we sought to review the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for depression in clinical applications. We conducted a PubMed search for publications through 2011. We assessed the adequacy of each report and abstracted information on reported effectiveness or efficacy of acupuncture as monotherapy for major depressive disorder (MDD) and as augmentation of ADs. We also examined adverse events associated with acupuncture, and evidence for acupuncture as a means of reducing side effects of ADs. Published data suggest that acupuncture, including manual-, electrical-, and laser-based, is a generally beneficial, well-tolerated, and safe monotherapy for depression. However, acupuncture augmentation in AD partial responders and nonresponders is not as well studied as monotherapy; and available studies have only investigated MDD, but not other depressive spectrum disorders. Manual acupuncture reduced side effects of ADs in MDD. We found no data on depressive recurrence rates after recovery with acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture is a potential effective monotherapy for depression, and a safe, well-tolerated augmentation in AD partial responders and nonresponders. However, the body of evidence based on well-designed studies is limited, and further investigation is called for.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202156
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.952
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.631
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, Junmei-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Albert-
dc.contributor.authorSchnyer, Rosa N.-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yunfei-
dc.contributor.authorMischoulon, David-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-22T02:57:44Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-22T02:57:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationCanadian Journal of Psychiatry, 2012, v. 57, n. 7, p. 397-405-
dc.identifier.issn0706-7437-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202156-
dc.description.abstractWhile increasing numbers of patients are seeking acupuncture treatment for depression in recent years, there is limited evidence of the antidepressant (AD) effectiveness of acupuncture. Given the unsatisfactory response rates of many Food and Drug Administration-approved ADs, research on acupuncture remains of potential value. Therefore, we sought to review the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for depression in clinical applications. We conducted a PubMed search for publications through 2011. We assessed the adequacy of each report and abstracted information on reported effectiveness or efficacy of acupuncture as monotherapy for major depressive disorder (MDD) and as augmentation of ADs. We also examined adverse events associated with acupuncture, and evidence for acupuncture as a means of reducing side effects of ADs. Published data suggest that acupuncture, including manual-, electrical-, and laser-based, is a generally beneficial, well-tolerated, and safe monotherapy for depression. However, acupuncture augmentation in AD partial responders and nonresponders is not as well studied as monotherapy; and available studies have only investigated MDD, but not other depressive spectrum disorders. Manual acupuncture reduced side effects of ADs in MDD. We found no data on depressive recurrence rates after recovery with acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture is a potential effective monotherapy for depression, and a safe, well-tolerated augmentation in AD partial responders and nonresponders. However, the body of evidence based on well-designed studies is limited, and further investigation is called for.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofCanadian Journal of Psychiatry-
dc.subjectAdverse events-
dc.subjectNonresponse-
dc.subjectEffectiveness-
dc.subjectDepression-
dc.subjectAugmentation-
dc.subjectAntidepressants-
dc.subjectAcupuncture-
dc.subjectSide effect-
dc.titleAcupuncture for depression: A review of clinical applications-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid22762294-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867572765-
dc.identifier.volume57-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage397-
dc.identifier.epage405-
dc.identifier.eissn1497-0015-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000306621800002-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats