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Article: Toward integrated assessment of environmental change: Air pollution health effects in the USA

TitleToward integrated assessment of environmental change: Air pollution health effects in the USA
Authors
Issue Date2008
Citation
Climatic Change, 2008, v. 88, n. 1, p. 59-92 How to Cite?
AbstractWe demonstrate a method for integrating environmental effects into a computable general equilibrium model. This is a critical step forward toward the development of improved integrated assessment models of environmental change. We apply the method to examine the economic consequences of air pollution on human health for the US for the period from 1970 to 2000. The pollutants include tropospheric ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter. We apply this method to the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the economy that has been widely used to study climate change policy. The method makes use of traditional valuation studies, incorporating this information so that estimates of welfare change are consistent with welfare valuation of the consumption of market goods and services. We estimate the benefits of air pollution regulations in USA rose steadily from 1975 to 2000 from $50 billion to $400 billion (from 2.1% to 7.6% of market consumption). Our estimated benefits of regulation are somewhat lower than the original estimates made by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and we trace that result to our development of a stock model of pollutant exposure that predicts that the benefits from reduced chronic air pollution exposure will only be gradually realized. We also estimate the economic burden of uncontrolled levels of air pollution over that period. The uncertainties in these estimates are large which we show through simulations using 95% confidence limits on the epidemiological dose-response relationships © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202137
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.344
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.149
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMatus, Kira J M-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Trent-
dc.contributor.authorPaltsev, Sergey V.-
dc.contributor.authorReilly, John M.-
dc.contributor.authorNam, Kyungmin-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-22T02:57:42Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-22T02:57:42Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationClimatic Change, 2008, v. 88, n. 1, p. 59-92en_US
dc.identifier.issn0165-0009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202137-
dc.description.abstractWe demonstrate a method for integrating environmental effects into a computable general equilibrium model. This is a critical step forward toward the development of improved integrated assessment models of environmental change. We apply the method to examine the economic consequences of air pollution on human health for the US for the period from 1970 to 2000. The pollutants include tropospheric ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter. We apply this method to the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the economy that has been widely used to study climate change policy. The method makes use of traditional valuation studies, incorporating this information so that estimates of welfare change are consistent with welfare valuation of the consumption of market goods and services. We estimate the benefits of air pollution regulations in USA rose steadily from 1975 to 2000 from $50 billion to $400 billion (from 2.1% to 7.6% of market consumption). Our estimated benefits of regulation are somewhat lower than the original estimates made by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and we trace that result to our development of a stock model of pollutant exposure that predicts that the benefits from reduced chronic air pollution exposure will only be gradually realized. We also estimate the economic burden of uncontrolled levels of air pollution over that period. The uncertainties in these estimates are large which we show through simulations using 95% confidence limits on the epidemiological dose-response relationships © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofClimatic Change-
dc.titleToward integrated assessment of environmental change: Air pollution health effects in the USA-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10584-006-9185-4-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-42049113424-
dc.identifier.volume88-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage59-
dc.identifier.epage92-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000254803800005-

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