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Book Chapter: Physiology of Vitreous Substitutes

TitlePhysiology of Vitreous Substitutes
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Physiology of Vitreous Substitutes. In Sebag, J (Ed.), Vitreous: in Health and Disease , p. 537-549. New York: Springer, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractHuman vitreous is a natural intraocular polymeric hydrogel with distinct biochemical and physiological functions. Surgical removal of the vitreous, or vitrectomy, is now commonly performed for the treatment of many vitreoretinal diseases. This has led to the need for developing substances that can be used to replace vitreous. Although early attempts for vitreous transplantation have yielded little success [1], a range of other vitreous substitutes has been developed. An ideal substitute should have all the good qualities of the human vitreous, including transparency, elasticity, buffer capacity, and biocompatibility with surrounding ocular tissues. However, none of the currently available vitreous substitutes possesses all these qualities. In modern vitreoretinal surgery, both short-acting (e.g., air, balanced salt solutions, expansile gases) and long-acting vitreous substitutes (e.g., silicone oil) are used. All these substitutes have significant shortcomings, mostly related to the lack of local biocompatibility and inadequate physiological role. In this chapter, we discuss the biophysical, biochemical, and physiological properties of the available vitreous substitutes, as well as their clinical use, advantages, and limitations. A separate chapter addresses the future potential of an artificial vitreous [see chapter I.F. Vitreous biochemistry and artificial vitreous].
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202087
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, YHIen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, NDen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, DSHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T08:03:30Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T08:03:30Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationPhysiology of Vitreous Substitutes. In Sebag, J (Ed.), Vitreous: in Health and Disease , p. 537-549. New York: Springer, 2014en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781493910854-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202087-
dc.description.abstractHuman vitreous is a natural intraocular polymeric hydrogel with distinct biochemical and physiological functions. Surgical removal of the vitreous, or vitrectomy, is now commonly performed for the treatment of many vitreoretinal diseases. This has led to the need for developing substances that can be used to replace vitreous. Although early attempts for vitreous transplantation have yielded little success [1], a range of other vitreous substitutes has been developed. An ideal substitute should have all the good qualities of the human vitreous, including transparency, elasticity, buffer capacity, and biocompatibility with surrounding ocular tissues. However, none of the currently available vitreous substitutes possesses all these qualities. In modern vitreoretinal surgery, both short-acting (e.g., air, balanced salt solutions, expansile gases) and long-acting vitreous substitutes (e.g., silicone oil) are used. All these substitutes have significant shortcomings, mostly related to the lack of local biocompatibility and inadequate physiological role. In this chapter, we discuss the biophysical, biochemical, and physiological properties of the available vitreous substitutes, as well as their clinical use, advantages, and limitations. A separate chapter addresses the future potential of an artificial vitreous [see chapter I.F. Vitreous biochemistry and artificial vitreous].-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofVitreous: in Health and Disease-
dc.titlePhysiology of Vitreous Substitutesen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, YHI: wongyhi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, ND: dc555@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, DSH: shdwong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, YHI=rp01467en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, ND=rp01752en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DSH=rp00516en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4939-1086-1_31-
dc.identifier.hkuros233182en_US
dc.identifier.spage537-
dc.identifier.epage549-
dc.publisher.placeNew Yorken_US

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