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Conference Paper: Do persons with intelectual disabilties understand death?

TitleDo persons with intelectual disabilties understand death?
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
The 2014 Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development (SWSD), Melbourne, Australia, 9-12 July 2014, p. 30 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: With the longer lifespan of the persons with Intelectual Disabilties (PWID), they have a higher chance of outliving their parents. The los of parents among PWID is intricate because of the exceptionaly intimate parent-child relationship. Yet, PWID are often considered as incapable to understand the concept of death, thus do not have the abilty to grieve. Aim: The study is to explore PWID’s level of understanding of death. Methodology: Persons with mild to moderate level of ID, who are service users of the Rehabiltation services of Tung Wah Group Hospitals, are the participants in this study. A stratifed random sampling aproach is adopted. Data were colected through an in-depth interview, guided by a standardized protocol. In particular, one of thre vignetes describing death-related incidents was used to ases the understanding of five dimensions of death: causality, inevitabilty, finality, non-functionality, and universality. Self-care abilty, bereavement experience and demographics were measured as wel. Findings: 104 participants joined the study, with 60 having had bereavement experiences. More than half of the participants showed a ful understanding towards the ireversibilty and non-functionality dimensions respectively. Around a third showed a ful understanding towards the universality and causality dimensions respectively. 31.7% of participants showed a ful understanding to the inevitabilty dimension. Gender and self-care abilty sems to have minimal efect in understanding the diferent dimension of conceptualization of death. Bereavement experiences were found to be corelated signifcantly with nearly al the dimensions (χ 2 ranged from 4.48 to 6.03, p < 0.05), except for ireversibilty. Conclusions: Though not al PWID can understand the concept of death, a signifcant group of participants, even asesed to be with moderate grade of intelectual disabilty, showed a ful understanding towards diferent dimensions of death conceptualization. It definitely refutes the hypothesis of persons with ID not understanding death.
DescriptionConference Theme: Promoting Social and Economic Equality: Responses from Social Work and Social Development
Concurent Sesion: 11E
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201809

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChow, AYMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KNen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwan, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:40:26Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:40:26Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development (SWSD), Melbourne, Australia, 9-12 July 2014, p. 30en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201809-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Promoting Social and Economic Equality: Responses from Social Work and Social Development-
dc.descriptionConcurent Sesion: 11E-
dc.description.abstractBackground: With the longer lifespan of the persons with Intelectual Disabilties (PWID), they have a higher chance of outliving their parents. The los of parents among PWID is intricate because of the exceptionaly intimate parent-child relationship. Yet, PWID are often considered as incapable to understand the concept of death, thus do not have the abilty to grieve. Aim: The study is to explore PWID’s level of understanding of death. Methodology: Persons with mild to moderate level of ID, who are service users of the Rehabiltation services of Tung Wah Group Hospitals, are the participants in this study. A stratifed random sampling aproach is adopted. Data were colected through an in-depth interview, guided by a standardized protocol. In particular, one of thre vignetes describing death-related incidents was used to ases the understanding of five dimensions of death: causality, inevitabilty, finality, non-functionality, and universality. Self-care abilty, bereavement experience and demographics were measured as wel. Findings: 104 participants joined the study, with 60 having had bereavement experiences. More than half of the participants showed a ful understanding towards the ireversibilty and non-functionality dimensions respectively. Around a third showed a ful understanding towards the universality and causality dimensions respectively. 31.7% of participants showed a ful understanding to the inevitabilty dimension. Gender and self-care abilty sems to have minimal efect in understanding the diferent dimension of conceptualization of death. Bereavement experiences were found to be corelated signifcantly with nearly al the dimensions (χ 2 ranged from 4.48 to 6.03, p < 0.05), except for ireversibilty. Conclusions: Though not al PWID can understand the concept of death, a signifcant group of participants, even asesed to be with moderate grade of intelectual disabilty, showed a ful understanding towards diferent dimensions of death conceptualization. It definitely refutes the hypothesis of persons with ID not understanding death.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJoint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development, SWSD 2014en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleDo persons with intelectual disabilties understand death?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChow, AYM: chowamy@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KN: ning66@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChow, AYM=rp00623en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros235113en_US
dc.identifier.spage30-
dc.identifier.epage30-

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