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Conference Paper: Childhood intrathecal chemotherapy: Language outcomes 11 years on

TitleChildhood intrathecal chemotherapy: Language outcomes 11 years on
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jns
Citation
The 21st World Congress of Neurology (WCN2013), Vienna, Austria, 21-26 September 2013. In Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 2013, v. 333 n. Suppl. 1, p. e579 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and objective: Studies suggest that major language indices do not differentiate children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC) from control children matched on age, gender and educational level. This case–/INS;control study used a sibling as a control to investigate language outcomes in a male child 11 years after the /INS;administration of ITC for ALL. Method: The Index case was a male aged 13 years 8 months at the time of his involvement in the study. At age 2 years 3 months he was diagnosed with standard risk ALL and was treated with ITC. For the current study, the Index case underwent behavioural assessment of language skills and neurophysiological assessment of language processing efficiency, with performance measures being descriptively compared to performance by his younger sibling. Results: Behavioural language testing failed to differentiate the siblings on current language performance, but neurophysiological assessment revealed that the ITC-treated child required more time to process information during a picture–/INS;word matching task. Conclusions: The study's findings offer pilot data of language outcomes following ITC beyond the early stage of survivorship. Information processing speed is important for skill and knowledge acquisition in normal development and it has been proposed that a slowed rate of information processing may be the first indicator of emerging neurocognitive deficits in children following CNS-directed treatments. Thus the Index case may be at risk of “growing into deficit” as he develops adolescent language skills. The benefits and limitations of using siblings in research investigating cognitive outcomes are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.
DescriptionConference Theme: Neurology in the Age of Globalization
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201619
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.126
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.024

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLewis, FMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSu, IFen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurdoch, BEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:32:10Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:32:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 21st World Congress of Neurology (WCN2013), Vienna, Austria, 21-26 September 2013. In Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 2013, v. 333 n. Suppl. 1, p. e579en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-510X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201619-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Neurology in the Age of Globalization-
dc.description.abstractBackground and objective: Studies suggest that major language indices do not differentiate children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC) from control children matched on age, gender and educational level. This case–/INS;control study used a sibling as a control to investigate language outcomes in a male child 11 years after the /INS;administration of ITC for ALL. Method: The Index case was a male aged 13 years 8 months at the time of his involvement in the study. At age 2 years 3 months he was diagnosed with standard risk ALL and was treated with ITC. For the current study, the Index case underwent behavioural assessment of language skills and neurophysiological assessment of language processing efficiency, with performance measures being descriptively compared to performance by his younger sibling. Results: Behavioural language testing failed to differentiate the siblings on current language performance, but neurophysiological assessment revealed that the ITC-treated child required more time to process information during a picture–/INS;word matching task. Conclusions: The study's findings offer pilot data of language outcomes following ITC beyond the early stage of survivorship. Information processing speed is important for skill and knowledge acquisition in normal development and it has been proposed that a slowed rate of information processing may be the first indicator of emerging neurocognitive deficits in children following CNS-directed treatments. Thus the Index case may be at risk of “growing into deficit” as he develops adolescent language skills. The benefits and limitations of using siblings in research investigating cognitive outcomes are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jns-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Neurological Sciencesen_US
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of the Neurological Sciences. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 2013, v. 333 n. Suppl. 1, p. e579 DOI# 10.1016/j.jns.2013.07.2024-
dc.titleChildhood intrathecal chemotherapy: Language outcomes 11 years onen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSu, IF: ifansu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySu, IF=rp01650en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jns.2013.07.2024en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros234973en_US
dc.identifier.volume333en_US
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spagee579en_US
dc.identifier.epagee579en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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