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Conference Paper: Sleep Moderates Effects of a Depressive Episode on Response Bias to Emotional Eyes

TitleSleep Moderates Effects of a Depressive Episode on Response Bias to Emotional Eyes
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org
Citation
The 28th Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC (APSS), Minneapolis, MN., 31 May-4 June 2014. In Sleep, 2014, v. 37 Abstract Suppl., p. A278-A279, abstract no. 0796 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Response bias was a tendency to say “yes” or “no” in distinguishing learnt materials from new information. Depressive individuals, even remitted, were reported to be biased in recalling negative experience. While poor sleep was shown to be associated with depressed mood, its role in emotion-modulated cognition (including response bias towards emotional stimuli) in depressed individuals remained to be determined. Methods: A community sample (n = 81, 32 males, aged 17-25, nonmedicated) was recruited and interviewed according to the structuralclinical- interview for DSM-IV disorders. Sixteen participants reported a depressive episode (depressive-episode group) in the lifetime, and the rest formed the control-group. Both groups completed a five-day sleeplog and emotional recognition memory task of positive, neutral and negative eyes. There was a learning- and testing-phase, separated by either a 90-minute polysomnography-monitored nap or wakefulness. Response bias (c’) was calculated following signal detection theory, with a negative c’ representing tendency to say “yes”, and positive c’ for “no”. Results: The depressive-episode and control-group were matched on demographics and sleep duration (ps > .05). A factorial design with two between-subject factors (depressive-episode and nap-condition) revealed a significant main effect of depressive-episode on positive eyes c’, F(1,72) = 5.74, p = .019, indicating more negative c’ towards positive eyes. Depressive-episode interacted with nap-condition on c’ of positive, F(1,72) = 4.432, p = .039, and negative eyes, F(1,72) = 5.895, p = .018. Post-hoc analyses (Mann-Whitney U test) showed that among the depressive-episode group, napped individuals had significantly more negative c’ on positive (p = .049) and negative eyes (p = .026). Among controls, there were no differences between the napped and wake individuals (ps > .05). Conclusion: Sleep was found to moderate the effects of depressive episode on response bias in emotionally-charged eyes: following a nap, individuals with depressive episode had a higher tendency to say “yes” to both positive and negative eyes, suggesting that sleep may facilitate recognition of both positive and negative information in individuals with depressive episode.
DescriptionClinical Sleep Science: 9. Psychiatic and Behavioral Disorder and Sleep
Poster Session P19: Sleep and Depression
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201428
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.793
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.606

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, EYYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:27:01Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:27:01Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 28th Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC (APSS), Minneapolis, MN., 31 May-4 June 2014. In Sleep, 2014, v. 37 Abstract Suppl., p. A278-A279, abstract no. 0796en_US
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201428-
dc.descriptionClinical Sleep Science: 9. Psychiatic and Behavioral Disorder and Sleep-
dc.descriptionPoster Session P19: Sleep and Depression-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Response bias was a tendency to say “yes” or “no” in distinguishing learnt materials from new information. Depressive individuals, even remitted, were reported to be biased in recalling negative experience. While poor sleep was shown to be associated with depressed mood, its role in emotion-modulated cognition (including response bias towards emotional stimuli) in depressed individuals remained to be determined. Methods: A community sample (n = 81, 32 males, aged 17-25, nonmedicated) was recruited and interviewed according to the structuralclinical- interview for DSM-IV disorders. Sixteen participants reported a depressive episode (depressive-episode group) in the lifetime, and the rest formed the control-group. Both groups completed a five-day sleeplog and emotional recognition memory task of positive, neutral and negative eyes. There was a learning- and testing-phase, separated by either a 90-minute polysomnography-monitored nap or wakefulness. Response bias (c’) was calculated following signal detection theory, with a negative c’ representing tendency to say “yes”, and positive c’ for “no”. Results: The depressive-episode and control-group were matched on demographics and sleep duration (ps > .05). A factorial design with two between-subject factors (depressive-episode and nap-condition) revealed a significant main effect of depressive-episode on positive eyes c’, F(1,72) = 5.74, p = .019, indicating more negative c’ towards positive eyes. Depressive-episode interacted with nap-condition on c’ of positive, F(1,72) = 4.432, p = .039, and negative eyes, F(1,72) = 5.895, p = .018. Post-hoc analyses (Mann-Whitney U test) showed that among the depressive-episode group, napped individuals had significantly more negative c’ on positive (p = .049) and negative eyes (p = .026). Among controls, there were no differences between the napped and wake individuals (ps > .05). Conclusion: Sleep was found to moderate the effects of depressive episode on response bias in emotionally-charged eyes: following a nap, individuals with depressive episode had a higher tendency to say “yes” to both positive and negative eyes, suggesting that sleep may facilitate recognition of both positive and negative information in individuals with depressive episode.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org-
dc.relation.ispartofSleepen_US
dc.titleSleep Moderates Effects of a Depressive Episode on Response Bias to Emotional Eyesen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, EYY: eyylau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, EYY=rp00634en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros234840en_US
dc.identifier.volume37-
dc.identifier.issueAbstract Suppl.-
dc.identifier.spageA278, abstract no. 0796-
dc.identifier.epageA279, abstract no. 0796-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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