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Conference Paper: The Roles of Victimization Experiences, Paranoia and Salience Misattribution in Predicting Psychosis Proneness: the Twinsscan China Study

TitleThe Roles of Victimization Experiences, Paranoia and Salience Misattribution in Predicting Psychosis Proneness: the Twinsscan China Study
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
Citation
The 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 5–9 April 2014. In Schizophrenia Research, 2014, v. 153 suppl.1, p. S339, abstract no. Poster #T140 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Subclinical psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) are reported to be relatively common in the general population. One approach to support the dimensional continuum from PLEs to clinical psychotic symptoms is to identify their common risk factors. Previous studies have identified victimization in school bullying as a risk factor for schizophrenia, but its association with psychosis proneness is yet to be established. Bullying victimization may not be directly associated with PLEs, but rather its effects may be mediated through cognitive mechanisms such as paranoia and salience misattribution. Also, few studies have compared the effects of high-school bullying with elementary-school bullying in predicting psychosis vulnerability. The present study aimed to address these questions by hypothesizing paranoid ideation and salience misattribution as mediators in the victimization-proneness relationship. METHODS: The sample comprised 100 Chinese adolescents (male=52, mean age=17.7, SD=1.95) who were recruited in Beijing and Hong Kong. Participants were normal, healthy individuals with no prior diagnostic history of mental illnesses. A set of three questionnaires and a computer-based task were administered to the participants. The Retrospective Bullying Questionnaire (RBQ) was used to measure the history of bullying in elementary school, high school and the workplace (Shaffer et al., 2004). Participants were asked to rate the frequency of bullying and describe their related experiences. Paranoid ideation was assessed using the Subscale PAR of Hopkins Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R), which measures a general cynicism towards others (Derogatis, 1977). The Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) was used to assess psychosis proneness. It consists of 42 items which measure the frequency and severity of positive, negative and depressive PLEs. Salience misattribution was assessed by the White Noise Task developed by Galdos and colleagues (2011). Participants were randomly presented with 75 sound clips in this 15-minute task. These clips were made of different combinations of noise and sentences from the materials of (i) noise, (ii) clearly audible sentence and (iii) barely audible sentences. Participants were asked to indicate whether they heard something positive, negative, neutral, nothing or uncertain. RESULTS: Supporting our hypothesis, paranoia was found to be a significant partial mediator in the relationship between bullying victimization and psychosis proneness (p=0.0225). Results suggested that more recent victimization experiences (high school bullying) could significantly predict overall symptoms of PLEs (p<0.001), but earlier childhood victimization (elementary school bullying) could not (p=0.355). Nevertheless, elementary school bullying was a significant predictor of paranoid ideation (p=0.004). Results also showed that victimization experiences in high school could significantly improve prediction of positive, negative and depressive PLEs (p<0.001). However, correlations of salience misattribution were reported to be non-significant with any other variables of interest. DISCUSSION: This study may shed light on the association between victimization experiences, paranoia and psychosis proneness, suggesting a pathway from environmental to cognitive factors in predicting proneness. By studying PLEs in healthy adolescents, it also lends support to the psychosis-as-continuum model in the literature. The study has demonstrated the potential traumatic effects of high school bullying, suggesting the importance of intervention programmes in educational settings.
DescriptionConference theme: Fostering Collaboration in Schizophrenia Research
Poster presentation
This journal suppl. entitled: Abstracts of the 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201419
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.304

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CNW-
dc.contributor.authorCotier, FA-
dc.contributor.authorMark, W-
dc.contributor.authorChen, P-
dc.contributor.authorvan Os, J-
dc.contributor.authorToulopoulou, T-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:27:00Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:27:00Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 5–9 April 2014. In Schizophrenia Research, 2014, v. 153 suppl.1, p. S339, abstract no. Poster #T140en_US
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201419-
dc.descriptionConference theme: Fostering Collaboration in Schizophrenia Research-
dc.descriptionPoster presentation-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Abstracts of the 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Subclinical psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) are reported to be relatively common in the general population. One approach to support the dimensional continuum from PLEs to clinical psychotic symptoms is to identify their common risk factors. Previous studies have identified victimization in school bullying as a risk factor for schizophrenia, but its association with psychosis proneness is yet to be established. Bullying victimization may not be directly associated with PLEs, but rather its effects may be mediated through cognitive mechanisms such as paranoia and salience misattribution. Also, few studies have compared the effects of high-school bullying with elementary-school bullying in predicting psychosis vulnerability. The present study aimed to address these questions by hypothesizing paranoid ideation and salience misattribution as mediators in the victimization-proneness relationship. METHODS: The sample comprised 100 Chinese adolescents (male=52, mean age=17.7, SD=1.95) who were recruited in Beijing and Hong Kong. Participants were normal, healthy individuals with no prior diagnostic history of mental illnesses. A set of three questionnaires and a computer-based task were administered to the participants. The Retrospective Bullying Questionnaire (RBQ) was used to measure the history of bullying in elementary school, high school and the workplace (Shaffer et al., 2004). Participants were asked to rate the frequency of bullying and describe their related experiences. Paranoid ideation was assessed using the Subscale PAR of Hopkins Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R), which measures a general cynicism towards others (Derogatis, 1977). The Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) was used to assess psychosis proneness. It consists of 42 items which measure the frequency and severity of positive, negative and depressive PLEs. Salience misattribution was assessed by the White Noise Task developed by Galdos and colleagues (2011). Participants were randomly presented with 75 sound clips in this 15-minute task. These clips were made of different combinations of noise and sentences from the materials of (i) noise, (ii) clearly audible sentence and (iii) barely audible sentences. Participants were asked to indicate whether they heard something positive, negative, neutral, nothing or uncertain. RESULTS: Supporting our hypothesis, paranoia was found to be a significant partial mediator in the relationship between bullying victimization and psychosis proneness (p=0.0225). Results suggested that more recent victimization experiences (high school bullying) could significantly predict overall symptoms of PLEs (p<0.001), but earlier childhood victimization (elementary school bullying) could not (p=0.355). Nevertheless, elementary school bullying was a significant predictor of paranoid ideation (p=0.004). Results also showed that victimization experiences in high school could significantly improve prediction of positive, negative and depressive PLEs (p<0.001). However, correlations of salience misattribution were reported to be non-significant with any other variables of interest. DISCUSSION: This study may shed light on the association between victimization experiences, paranoia and psychosis proneness, suggesting a pathway from environmental to cognitive factors in predicting proneness. By studying PLEs in healthy adolescents, it also lends support to the psychosis-as-continuum model in the literature. The study has demonstrated the potential traumatic effects of high school bullying, suggesting the importance of intervention programmes in educational settings.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres-
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Researchen_US
dc.titleThe Roles of Victimization Experiences, Paranoia and Salience Misattribution in Predicting Psychosis Proneness: the Twinsscan China Studyen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailToulopoulou, T: timothea@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityToulopoulou, T=rp01542en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0920-9964(14)70957-0-
dc.identifier.hkuros233855en_US
dc.identifier.volume153-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.1-
dc.identifier.spageS339, abstract no. Poster #T140-
dc.identifier.epageS339, abstract no. Poster #T140-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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