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Conference Paper: Self-esteem and Psychopathology among Chinese Teenagers and University Students

TitleSelf-esteem and Psychopathology among Chinese Teenagers and University Students
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
Citation
The 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 5–9 April 2014. In Schizophrenia Research, 2014, v. 153 suppl.1, p. S257, abstract no. Poster #M184 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Self-esteem has been reported to be an important predictor of psychopathology including depression, suicidal ideation, and aggression. However, these findings are mainly from Western populations and their impact on Chinese adolescent’s mental health is unknown. The objective of present study was to evaluate the role of self-esteem on psychopathology in a Chinese young population. METHODS: A sample of 90 school and university students aged between 15-23 years old was registered in the present study, including 44 female and 46 male. Self-esteem was measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (RSES). This yielded 3 measures: overall score, self-competence and self-liking. The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90-R) was applied to assess specific psychopathology including somatization, obsessive compulsive behavior, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism. In addition, the total score of those nine dimensions provided a Global Severity Index (GSI). We used multiple linear regression analysis to explore whether self-esteem could predict psychopathology after controlling the potential confounding effects of age and gender. RESULTS: In our data setting, after adjustment for age and gender, there were significant negative correlations between the overall RSES score and score of phobic anxiety (β=−0.27, P=0.01). Furthermore, significant correlations were found between RSES self-liking scores and obsessive compulsive behavior (β=−0.33, P=0.002), interpersonal sensitivity (β=−0.33, P=0.002), depression (β=−0.37, P=0.0003), anxiety (β=−0.35, P=0.001), hostility (β=−0.21, P=0.048), phobic anxiety (β=−0.33, P=0.002), psychoticism (β=−0.29, P=0.007), and GSI (β=−0.34, P=0.001). Higher self-liking in Chinese teenagers and university students was related with less psychopathological risk of obsessive compulsive behavior, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety as well as psychoticism. Interestingly, no significant correlation was detected for self-competence scores. DISCUSSION: In this Chinese cohort of adolescents and young adults, consistently with the western population, self-esteem significantly correlated with psychopathology. Specifically, higher self-liking predicted less psychopathology. The results promote better understanding of the relationship between self-esteem and the risk of mental illness, which may inform potential clinical intervention programs in the future.
DescriptionConference theme: Fostering Collaboration in Schizophrenia Research
Poster presentation
This journal suppl. entitled: Abstracts of the 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201412
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.304

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, LHen_US
dc.contributor.authorCotier, FAen_US
dc.contributor.authorMark, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorKong, KYPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KSSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CNWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorvan Os, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorToulopoulou, Ten_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:26:59Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:26:59Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 5–9 April 2014. In Schizophrenia Research, 2014, v. 153 suppl.1, p. S257, abstract no. Poster #M184en_US
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201412-
dc.descriptionConference theme: Fostering Collaboration in Schizophrenia Researchen_US
dc.descriptionPoster presentation-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Abstracts of the 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Self-esteem has been reported to be an important predictor of psychopathology including depression, suicidal ideation, and aggression. However, these findings are mainly from Western populations and their impact on Chinese adolescent’s mental health is unknown. The objective of present study was to evaluate the role of self-esteem on psychopathology in a Chinese young population. METHODS: A sample of 90 school and university students aged between 15-23 years old was registered in the present study, including 44 female and 46 male. Self-esteem was measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (RSES). This yielded 3 measures: overall score, self-competence and self-liking. The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90-R) was applied to assess specific psychopathology including somatization, obsessive compulsive behavior, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism. In addition, the total score of those nine dimensions provided a Global Severity Index (GSI). We used multiple linear regression analysis to explore whether self-esteem could predict psychopathology after controlling the potential confounding effects of age and gender. RESULTS: In our data setting, after adjustment for age and gender, there were significant negative correlations between the overall RSES score and score of phobic anxiety (β=−0.27, P=0.01). Furthermore, significant correlations were found between RSES self-liking scores and obsessive compulsive behavior (β=−0.33, P=0.002), interpersonal sensitivity (β=−0.33, P=0.002), depression (β=−0.37, P=0.0003), anxiety (β=−0.35, P=0.001), hostility (β=−0.21, P=0.048), phobic anxiety (β=−0.33, P=0.002), psychoticism (β=−0.29, P=0.007), and GSI (β=−0.34, P=0.001). Higher self-liking in Chinese teenagers and university students was related with less psychopathological risk of obsessive compulsive behavior, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety as well as psychoticism. Interestingly, no significant correlation was detected for self-competence scores. DISCUSSION: In this Chinese cohort of adolescents and young adults, consistently with the western population, self-esteem significantly correlated with psychopathology. Specifically, higher self-liking predicted less psychopathology. The results promote better understanding of the relationship between self-esteem and the risk of mental illness, which may inform potential clinical intervention programs in the future.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schresen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Researchen_US
dc.titleSelf-esteem and Psychopathology among Chinese Teenagers and University Studentsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, LP: luhua@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKong, KYP: foekong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KSS: shellyks@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailToulopoulou, T: timothea@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityToulopoulou, T=rp01542en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0920-9964(14)70734-0en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros232077en_US
dc.identifier.volume153en_US
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.1en_US
dc.identifier.spageS257, abstract no. Poster #M184en_US
dc.identifier.epageS257, abstract no. Poster #M184en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US

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