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Article: Social Vulnerability Index for the Older People —Hong Kong and New York City as Examples

TitleSocial Vulnerability Index for the Older People —Hong Kong and New York City as Examples
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/1099-3460
Citation
Journal of Urban Health: bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 2014, v. 91 n. 6, p. 1048-1064 How to Cite?
AbstractMany world cities have suffered large-scale disasters, causing a significant loss of lives, property damage, and adverse social and economic impact. Those who are most vulnerable during and in the immediate aftermath of disaster crises are the elderly. Therefore, it is imperative to identify them and determine their specific needs in order to support them. Although several Social Vulnerability Indexes (SVIs) have been developed to assess different types of disaster vulnerability across geographic and population levels, few have been tailored to the older population. Building on the research of Gusmano et al., this study modifies and uses an SVI specifically designed to assess the vulnerability of older populations to emergencies and disasters across seven domains, namely, population size, institutionalization, poverty, living alone, disability, communication obstacles, and access to primary care. Moreover, it is acknowledged that availability of data largely depends on the local context and is always a barrier to production of indices across countries. The present study offers suggestions on how modifications can be made for local adaptation such that the SVI can be applied in different cities and localities. The SVI used in this study provides information to stakeholders in emergency preparedness, not only about natural disasters but also about health hazards and emergencies, which few existing SVI address.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201294
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.046
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.244
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChau, PH-
dc.contributor.authorGusmano, MK-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, JOY-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, SH-
dc.contributor.authorWoo, J-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:21:57Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:21:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Urban Health: bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 2014, v. 91 n. 6, p. 1048-1064-
dc.identifier.issn1099-3460-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201294-
dc.description.abstractMany world cities have suffered large-scale disasters, causing a significant loss of lives, property damage, and adverse social and economic impact. Those who are most vulnerable during and in the immediate aftermath of disaster crises are the elderly. Therefore, it is imperative to identify them and determine their specific needs in order to support them. Although several Social Vulnerability Indexes (SVIs) have been developed to assess different types of disaster vulnerability across geographic and population levels, few have been tailored to the older population. Building on the research of Gusmano et al., this study modifies and uses an SVI specifically designed to assess the vulnerability of older populations to emergencies and disasters across seven domains, namely, population size, institutionalization, poverty, living alone, disability, communication obstacles, and access to primary care. Moreover, it is acknowledged that availability of data largely depends on the local context and is always a barrier to production of indices across countries. The present study offers suggestions on how modifications can be made for local adaptation such that the SVI can be applied in different cities and localities. The SVI used in this study provides information to stakeholders in emergency preparedness, not only about natural disasters but also about health hazards and emergencies, which few existing SVI address.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/1099-3460-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Urban Health: bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine-
dc.titleSocial Vulnerability Index for the Older People —Hong Kong and New York City as Examples-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChau, PH: phpchau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, JOY: jojo1216@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, SH: shch2@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWoo, J: jeanwoo@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChau, PH=rp00574-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11524-014-9901-8-
dc.identifier.pmid25216790-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4242856-
dc.identifier.hkuros234706-
dc.identifier.volume91-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1048-
dc.identifier.epage1064-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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