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Article: Going Global: Contemporary International Networking in Chinese Mainland Universities

TitleGoing Global: Contemporary International Networking in Chinese Mainland Universities
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherM.E.Sharpe Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/mced20/current
Citation
Chinese Education and Society, 2014, v. 47 n. 1, p. 27-43 How to Cite?
AbstractThe educational exchange relationship between developed and developing (not accidentally non-Western) countries has always been characterized by imbalances and asymmetries. Accordingly, the traditional forms of North-South relationships have been between donors and recipients. International educational exchange between developed and developing countries needs to be located in a historical context of colonialism, and many constraints continue to pose barriers to genuine partnership. Today, neocolonialism is the relationship that developing countries have to deal with. The present international educational equation has certain institutional and intellectual 'centers' that give direction, provide models, produce research, and in general function as the pinnacles of the academic system. At the opposite end of the spectrum are universities that are peripheral in the sense that they copy development from abroad, produce little that is original, and are generally not at the frontiers of knowledge. Educational institutions located in developing countries are strongly dependent on the institutions located in the centers.Meanwhile, the contemporary academic world is becoming increasingly multipolarized. A critical mass of non-Western scholarship is emerging, and beginning to force a reconsideration of traditional concepts and theories. The latest work in research fields is done at many more centers of scholarship than before. China, a giant periphery, as some scholars describe it, is especially noticeable and should be treated seriously, with its massive investment on research and development. Based on long-standing observation of the Chinese higher education system, this article explores the maintenance of international links in Mainland Chinese universities, set in an international context. It ends with some critical comments and constructive suggestions, with particular regard to the genuine collaboration and reciprocity in international educational exchange between the best institutions in the developed countries and their Chinese peers. © 2014 M.E. Sharpe, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201003
ISSN
2009 Impact Factor: 0.131
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.115

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:08:50Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:08:50Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationChinese Education and Society, 2014, v. 47 n. 1, p. 27-43en_US
dc.identifier.issn1061-1932-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201003-
dc.description.abstractThe educational exchange relationship between developed and developing (not accidentally non-Western) countries has always been characterized by imbalances and asymmetries. Accordingly, the traditional forms of North-South relationships have been between donors and recipients. International educational exchange between developed and developing countries needs to be located in a historical context of colonialism, and many constraints continue to pose barriers to genuine partnership. Today, neocolonialism is the relationship that developing countries have to deal with. The present international educational equation has certain institutional and intellectual 'centers' that give direction, provide models, produce research, and in general function as the pinnacles of the academic system. At the opposite end of the spectrum are universities that are peripheral in the sense that they copy development from abroad, produce little that is original, and are generally not at the frontiers of knowledge. Educational institutions located in developing countries are strongly dependent on the institutions located in the centers.Meanwhile, the contemporary academic world is becoming increasingly multipolarized. A critical mass of non-Western scholarship is emerging, and beginning to force a reconsideration of traditional concepts and theories. The latest work in research fields is done at many more centers of scholarship than before. China, a giant periphery, as some scholars describe it, is especially noticeable and should be treated seriously, with its massive investment on research and development. Based on long-standing observation of the Chinese higher education system, this article explores the maintenance of international links in Mainland Chinese universities, set in an international context. It ends with some critical comments and constructive suggestions, with particular regard to the genuine collaboration and reciprocity in international educational exchange between the best institutions in the developed countries and their Chinese peers. © 2014 M.E. Sharpe, Inc. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherM.E.Sharpe Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/mced20/currenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Education and Societyen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleGoing Global: Contemporary International Networking in Chinese Mainland Universitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, R: yangrui@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYang, R=rp00980en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.2753/CED1061-1932470102-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84902011524-
dc.identifier.hkuros234041en_US
dc.identifier.volume47en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage27en_US
dc.identifier.epage43en_US
dc.publisher.placeNew Yorken_US

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