File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Stenting of the eustachian tube to prevent otitis media with effusion after maxillary swing approach nasopharyngectomy

TitleStenting of the eustachian tube to prevent otitis media with effusion after maxillary swing approach nasopharyngectomy
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.laryngoscope.com/
Citation
The Laryngoscope, 2014, v. 124 n. 1, p. 139-144 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Our previous report recommended that the management of ipsilateral otitis media with effusion (OME) after maxillary swing nasopharyngectomy was observation. The idea of introducing a stent into the eustachian tube (ET) at the nasopharyngeal side after nasopharyngectomy may prevent postoperative OME. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of intraoperative ET stenting and the efficacy of preventing ipsilateral OME formation. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: From 2009 to 2011, 28 patients with nasopharyngectomy via the maxillary swing approach were recruited. Patients with curative resection were recruited (n = 21). ET stenting was performed intraoperatively using a 16-gauge Angiocath (BD Medical Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ) with dimensions of 1.7 mm x 30 mm. The stent stays inplace indefinitely. The otologic status was evaluated using otoscopy, pure-tone audiogram, and tympanogram at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the surgery. The outcomes were analyzed and compared with historical control. RESULTS: There were 9 (43%) patients with no OME at 6 months after surgery, and 15 (71%) patients had no OME at 1 year postoperatively. The results were statistically significant (P < .0001) when compared with our historical control of no ET stenting. There was no incidence of adverse effects of the stenting, such as acute otitis media, dislodgement of the stent, otalgia, and nasal pain. CONCLUSIONS: ET stenting was feasible after nasopharyngectomy. ET stenting prevented a significant number of patients from suffering from ipsilateral OME and alleviated the symptoms of unilateral aural fullness and unilateral conductive hearing impairment up to at least 1 year after the surgery. ET stenting is recommended in all patients after maxillary swing nasopharyngectomy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200932
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.272
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.342
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, ACWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JYWen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, RWMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, WKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:07:38Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:07:38Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Laryngoscope, 2014, v. 124 n. 1, p. 139-144en_US
dc.identifier.issn0023-852X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200932-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Our previous report recommended that the management of ipsilateral otitis media with effusion (OME) after maxillary swing nasopharyngectomy was observation. The idea of introducing a stent into the eustachian tube (ET) at the nasopharyngeal side after nasopharyngectomy may prevent postoperative OME. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of intraoperative ET stenting and the efficacy of preventing ipsilateral OME formation. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: From 2009 to 2011, 28 patients with nasopharyngectomy via the maxillary swing approach were recruited. Patients with curative resection were recruited (n = 21). ET stenting was performed intraoperatively using a 16-gauge Angiocath (BD Medical Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ) with dimensions of 1.7 mm x 30 mm. The stent stays inplace indefinitely. The otologic status was evaluated using otoscopy, pure-tone audiogram, and tympanogram at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the surgery. The outcomes were analyzed and compared with historical control. RESULTS: There were 9 (43%) patients with no OME at 6 months after surgery, and 15 (71%) patients had no OME at 1 year postoperatively. The results were statistically significant (P < .0001) when compared with our historical control of no ET stenting. There was no incidence of adverse effects of the stenting, such as acute otitis media, dislodgement of the stent, otalgia, and nasal pain. CONCLUSIONS: ET stenting was feasible after nasopharyngectomy. ET stenting prevented a significant number of patients from suffering from ipsilateral OME and alleviated the symptoms of unilateral aural fullness and unilateral conductive hearing impairment up to at least 1 year after the surgery. ET stenting is recommended in all patients after maxillary swing nasopharyngectomy.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.laryngoscope.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Laryngoscopeen_US
dc.rightsThe Laryngoscope. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.subject.meshEustachian Tube - surgery-
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms - surgery-
dc.subject.meshOtitis Media with Effusion - etiology - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshPharyngectomy - adverse effects - methods-
dc.subject.meshStents-
dc.titleStenting of the eustachian tube to prevent otitis media with effusion after maxillary swing approach nasopharyngectomyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, ACW: aho1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, JYW: jywchan1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, RWM: ngwmr@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, WK: wkho@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, JYW=rp01314en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/lary.24320-
dc.identifier.pmid23878003-
dc.identifier.hkuros231978en_US
dc.identifier.volume124en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage139en_US
dc.identifier.epage144en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000328738800032-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats