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Article: Effects of context and word class on lexical retrieval in Chinese speakers with anomic aphasia

TitleEffects of context and word class on lexical retrieval in Chinese speakers with anomic aphasia
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02687038.asp
Citation
Aphasiology, 2015, v. 29 n. 1, p. 81-100 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Differences in processing nouns and verbs have been investigated intensely in psycholinguistics and neuropsychology in past decades. However, the majority of studies examining retrieval of these word classes have involved tasks of single word stimuli or responses. While the results have provided rich information for addressing issues about grammatical class distinctions, it is unclear whether they have adequate ecological validity for understanding lexical retrieval in connected speech which characterizes daily verbal communication. Previous investigations comparing retrieval of nouns and verbs in single word production and connected speech have reported either discrepant performance between the two contexts with presence of word class dissociation in picture naming but absence in connected speech, or null effects of word class. In addition, word finding difficulties have been found to be less severe in connected speech than picture naming. However, these studies have failed to match target stimuli of the two word classes and between tasks on psycholinguistic variables known to affect performance in response latency and/or accuracy. Aims: The present study compared lexical retrieval of nouns and verbs in picture naming and connected speech from picture description, procedural description, and story-telling among 19 Chinese speakers with anomic aphasia and their age, gender, and education matched healthy controls, to understand the influence of grammatical class on word production across speech contexts when target items were balanced for confounding variables between word classes and tasks. Methods & Procedures: Elicitation of responses followed the protocol of the AphasiaBank consortium (http://talkbank.org/AphasiaBank/). Target words for confrontation naming were based on well-established naming tests, while those for narrative were drawn from a large database of normal speakers. Selected nouns and verbs in the two contexts were matched for age-of-acquisition (AoA) and familiarity. Influence of imageability was removed through statistical control. Outcomes & Results: When AoA and familiarity were balanced, nouns were retrieved better than verbs, and performance was higher in picture naming than connected speech. When imageability was further controlled for, only the effect of task remained significant. Conclusions: The absence of word class effects when confounding variables are controlled for is similar to many previous reports; however, the pattern of better word retrieval in naming is rare but compatible with the account that processing demands are higher in narrative than naming. The overall findings have strongly suggested the importance of including connected speech tasks in any language assessment and evaluation of language rehabilitation of individuals with aphasia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200909

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorKong, PHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorLAI, CTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:06:45Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:06:45Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationAphasiology, 2015, v. 29 n. 1, p. 81-100en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200909-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Differences in processing nouns and verbs have been investigated intensely in psycholinguistics and neuropsychology in past decades. However, the majority of studies examining retrieval of these word classes have involved tasks of single word stimuli or responses. While the results have provided rich information for addressing issues about grammatical class distinctions, it is unclear whether they have adequate ecological validity for understanding lexical retrieval in connected speech which characterizes daily verbal communication. Previous investigations comparing retrieval of nouns and verbs in single word production and connected speech have reported either discrepant performance between the two contexts with presence of word class dissociation in picture naming but absence in connected speech, or null effects of word class. In addition, word finding difficulties have been found to be less severe in connected speech than picture naming. However, these studies have failed to match target stimuli of the two word classes and between tasks on psycholinguistic variables known to affect performance in response latency and/or accuracy. Aims: The present study compared lexical retrieval of nouns and verbs in picture naming and connected speech from picture description, procedural description, and story-telling among 19 Chinese speakers with anomic aphasia and their age, gender, and education matched healthy controls, to understand the influence of grammatical class on word production across speech contexts when target items were balanced for confounding variables between word classes and tasks. Methods & Procedures: Elicitation of responses followed the protocol of the AphasiaBank consortium (http://talkbank.org/AphasiaBank/). Target words for confrontation naming were based on well-established naming tests, while those for narrative were drawn from a large database of normal speakers. Selected nouns and verbs in the two contexts were matched for age-of-acquisition (AoA) and familiarity. Influence of imageability was removed through statistical control. Outcomes & Results: When AoA and familiarity were balanced, nouns were retrieved better than verbs, and performance was higher in picture naming than connected speech. When imageability was further controlled for, only the effect of task remained significant. Conclusions: The absence of word class effects when confounding variables are controlled for is similar to many previous reports; however, the pattern of better word retrieval in naming is rare but compatible with the account that processing demands are higher in narrative than naming. The overall findings have strongly suggested the importance of including connected speech tasks in any language assessment and evaluation of language rehabilitation of individuals with aphasia.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02687038.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAphasiologyen_US
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT ‘This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.en_US
dc.titleEffects of context and word class on lexical retrieval in Chinese speakers with anomic aphasiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLaw, SP: splaw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKong, PH: antkong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, SP=rp00920en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02687038.2014.951598-
dc.identifier.hkuros233635en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US

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