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Article: A coding system with independent annotations of gesture forms and functions during verbal communication: Development of a Database of Speech and GEsture (DoSaGE)

TitleA coding system with independent annotations of gesture forms and functions during verbal communication: Development of a Database of Speech and GEsture (DoSaGE)
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0191-5886
Citation
Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 2015, v. 39 n. 1, p. 93-111 How to Cite?
AbstractGestures are commonly used together with spoken language in human communication. One major limitation of gesture investigations in the existing literature lies in the fact that the coding of forms and functions of gestures has not been clearly differentiated. This paper first described a recently developed Database of Speech and GEsture (DoSaGE) based on independent annotation of gesture forms and functions among 119 neurologically unimpaired right-handed native speakers of Cantonese (divided into three age and two education levels), and presented findings of an investigation examining how gesture use was related to age and linguistic performance. Consideration of these two factors, for which normative data are currently very limited or lacking in the literature, is relevant and necessary when one evaluates gesture employment among individuals with and without language impairment. Three speech tasks, including monologue of a personally important event, sequential description, and story-telling, were used for elicitation. The EUDICO Linguistic ANnotator (ELAN) software was used to independently annotate each participant’s linguistic information of the transcript, forms of gestures used, and the function for each gesture. About one-third of the subjects did not use any co-verbal gestures. While the majority of gestures were non-content-carrying, which functioned mainly for reinforcing speech intonation or controlling speech flow, the content-carrying ones were used to enhance speech content. Furthermore, individuals who are younger or linguistically more proficient tended to use fewer gestures, suggesting that normal speakers gesture differently as a function of age and linguistic performance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200908

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKong, PHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwan, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLAI, CTen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, Ven_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:06:45Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:06:45Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Nonverbal Behavior, 2015, v. 39 n. 1, p. 93-111en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200908-
dc.description.abstractGestures are commonly used together with spoken language in human communication. One major limitation of gesture investigations in the existing literature lies in the fact that the coding of forms and functions of gestures has not been clearly differentiated. This paper first described a recently developed Database of Speech and GEsture (DoSaGE) based on independent annotation of gesture forms and functions among 119 neurologically unimpaired right-handed native speakers of Cantonese (divided into three age and two education levels), and presented findings of an investigation examining how gesture use was related to age and linguistic performance. Consideration of these two factors, for which normative data are currently very limited or lacking in the literature, is relevant and necessary when one evaluates gesture employment among individuals with and without language impairment. Three speech tasks, including monologue of a personally important event, sequential description, and story-telling, were used for elicitation. The EUDICO Linguistic ANnotator (ELAN) software was used to independently annotate each participant’s linguistic information of the transcript, forms of gestures used, and the function for each gesture. About one-third of the subjects did not use any co-verbal gestures. While the majority of gestures were non-content-carrying, which functioned mainly for reinforcing speech intonation or controlling speech flow, the content-carrying ones were used to enhance speech content. Furthermore, individuals who are younger or linguistically more proficient tended to use fewer gestures, suggesting that normal speakers gesture differently as a function of age and linguistic performance.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0191-5886en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Nonverbal Behavioren_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_US
dc.titleA coding system with independent annotations of gesture forms and functions during verbal communication: Development of a Database of Speech and GEsture (DoSaGE)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKong, PH: antkong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLaw, SP: splaw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, SP=rp00920en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10919-014-0200-6-
dc.identifier.hkuros233629en_US
dc.publisher.placeNew York, USAen_US

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