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Article: Male partners' attachment styles as predictors of women's coerced first sexual intercourse in Chinese college students' dating relationships

TitleMale partners' attachment styles as predictors of women's coerced first sexual intercourse in Chinese college students' dating relationships
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer Publishing Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerpub.com/product/08866708
Citation
Violence and Victims, 2014, v. 29 n. 5, p. 771-783 How to Cite?
AbstractAttachment theory has great potential to help our understanding of the apparent contradiction between violence and intimacy. Yet very few studies applied this theory to explain or predict sexual coercion in the context of intimate relationships. This study examined the relation between male partners’ attachment styles and women’s coerced first sexual intercourse in dating relationships. There were 927 valid questionnaires collected by purposive snowball sampling in five main cities in China to college students who were currently in a romantic relationship. Results showed that in both male and female samples, male partners’ anxious attachment style were significantly and positively predicted emotional manipulation coercive tactics. In the female sample, male partners’ two attachment styles (anxious and avoidant) positively predicted violence threat tactics, and male partners’ avoidant attachment style positively predicted defection threat tactics. The research hypothesis of this study has been successfully supported, and implications and limitations were discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200869
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 0.598
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.449
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, S-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, SKM-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:04:25Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:04:25Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationViolence and Victims, 2014, v. 29 n. 5, p. 771-783-
dc.identifier.issn0886-6708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200869-
dc.description.abstractAttachment theory has great potential to help our understanding of the apparent contradiction between violence and intimacy. Yet very few studies applied this theory to explain or predict sexual coercion in the context of intimate relationships. This study examined the relation between male partners’ attachment styles and women’s coerced first sexual intercourse in dating relationships. There were 927 valid questionnaires collected by purposive snowball sampling in five main cities in China to college students who were currently in a romantic relationship. Results showed that in both male and female samples, male partners’ anxious attachment style were significantly and positively predicted emotional manipulation coercive tactics. In the female sample, male partners’ two attachment styles (anxious and avoidant) positively predicted violence threat tactics, and male partners’ avoidant attachment style positively predicted defection threat tactics. The research hypothesis of this study has been successfully supported, and implications and limitations were discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Publishing Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerpub.com/product/08866708-
dc.relation.ispartofViolence and Victims-
dc.titleMale partners' attachment styles as predictors of women's coerced first sexual intercourse in Chinese college students' dating relationships-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTsang, SKM: hokitman@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, SKM=rp00594-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1891/0886-6708.VV-D-12-00116-
dc.identifier.pmid25905127-
dc.identifier.hkuros234334-
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage771-
dc.identifier.epage783-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000345680800004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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