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Article: A Correlation Study Between In-brace Correction, Compliance To Spinal Orthosis And Health-related Quality Of Life Of Patients With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

TitleA Correlation Study Between In-brace Correction, Compliance To Spinal Orthosis And Health-related Quality Of Life Of Patients With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherBioMed Central. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.scoliosisjournal.com/home/
Citation
Scoliosis, 2014, v. 9, article no. 1 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground It has been proposed that in-brace correction is the best guideline for prediction of the results of brace treatment for patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS). However, bracing may be a stressful experience for patients and bracing non-compliance could be psychologically related. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between brace compliance, in-brace correction and QoL of patients with AIS. Methods Fifty-five patients with a diagnosis of AIS were recruited. All were female and aged 10 years or above when a brace was prescribed, none had undergone prior treatment, and all had a Risser sign of 0–2 and a Cobb angle of 25-40°. The patients were examined in three consecutive visits with 4 to 6 months between each visit. The Chinese translated Trunk Appearance Perception Scale (TAPS), the Chinese translated Brace Questionnaires (BrQ) and the Chinese translated SRS-22 Questionnaires were used in the study. The in-brace Cobb angle, vertebral rotation and trunk listing were also measured. Patients’ compliance, in-brace correction and patients’ QoL were assessed. To identify the relationship among these three areas, logistic regression model and generalized linear model were used. Result For the compliance measure, a significant difference (p = 0.008) was detected on TAPS mean score difference between Visit 1 and Visit 2 in the least compliant group (0–8 hours) and the most compliant group (17–23 hours). In addition, a significant difference (p = 0.000) was detected on BrQ mean score difference between Visit 2 and Visit 3 in the least compliant group (0–8 hours) and the most compliant group (17–23 hours). For the orthosis effectiveness measure, no significant difference was detected between the three groups of bracing hours (0–8 hours, 9–16 hours, 17–23 hours) on in-brace correction (below 40% and 40% or above). For the QoL measure, no significant difference was detected between the two different in-brace correction groups (below 40% and 40% or above) on QoL as reflected by the TAPS, BrQ and SRS-22r mean scores. Conclusion The results showed a positive relationship between patients’ brace wear compliance and patients’ QoL. Poor compliance would cause a lower QoL.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200763
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T06:59:50Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T06:59:50Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationScoliosis, 2014, v. 9, article no. 1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200763-
dc.description.abstractBackground It has been proposed that in-brace correction is the best guideline for prediction of the results of brace treatment for patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS). However, bracing may be a stressful experience for patients and bracing non-compliance could be psychologically related. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between brace compliance, in-brace correction and QoL of patients with AIS. Methods Fifty-five patients with a diagnosis of AIS were recruited. All were female and aged 10 years or above when a brace was prescribed, none had undergone prior treatment, and all had a Risser sign of 0–2 and a Cobb angle of 25-40°. The patients were examined in three consecutive visits with 4 to 6 months between each visit. The Chinese translated Trunk Appearance Perception Scale (TAPS), the Chinese translated Brace Questionnaires (BrQ) and the Chinese translated SRS-22 Questionnaires were used in the study. The in-brace Cobb angle, vertebral rotation and trunk listing were also measured. Patients’ compliance, in-brace correction and patients’ QoL were assessed. To identify the relationship among these three areas, logistic regression model and generalized linear model were used. Result For the compliance measure, a significant difference (p = 0.008) was detected on TAPS mean score difference between Visit 1 and Visit 2 in the least compliant group (0–8 hours) and the most compliant group (17–23 hours). In addition, a significant difference (p = 0.000) was detected on BrQ mean score difference between Visit 2 and Visit 3 in the least compliant group (0–8 hours) and the most compliant group (17–23 hours). For the orthosis effectiveness measure, no significant difference was detected between the three groups of bracing hours (0–8 hours, 9–16 hours, 17–23 hours) on in-brace correction (below 40% and 40% or above). For the QoL measure, no significant difference was detected between the two different in-brace correction groups (below 40% and 40% or above) on QoL as reflected by the TAPS, BrQ and SRS-22r mean scores. Conclusion The results showed a positive relationship between patients’ brace wear compliance and patients’ QoL. Poor compliance would cause a lower QoL.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.scoliosisjournal.com/home/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScoliosisen_US
dc.rightsScoliosis. Copyright © BioMed Central.en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleA Correlation Study Between In-brace Correction, Compliance To Spinal Orthosis And Health-related Quality Of Life Of Patients With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, SL: pollycha@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hrmoldk@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SL=rp00242en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1748-7161-9-1en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24559234-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3996075-
dc.identifier.hkuros233464en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US

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