File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Collaborative gaze channelling for improved cooperation during robotic assisted surgery

TitleCollaborative gaze channelling for improved cooperation during robotic assisted surgery
Authors
KeywordsCollaborative surgical task
Human-robot interface
Perceptual docking
Robotic surgery
Eye tracking
Issue Date2012
Citation
Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 2012, v. 40, n. 10, p. 2156-2167 How to Cite?
AbstractThe use of multiple robots for performing complex tasks is becoming a common practice for many robot applications. When different operators are involved, effective cooperation with anticipated manoeuvres is important for seamless, synergistic control of all the end-effectors. In this paper, the concept of Collaborative Gaze Channelling (CGC) is presented for improved control of surgical robots for a shared task. Through eye tracking, the fixations of each operator are monitored and presented in a shared surgical workspace. CGC permits remote or physically separated collaborators to share their intention by visualising the eye gaze of their counterparts, and thus recovers, to a certain extent, the information of mutual intent that we rely upon in a vis-à-vis working setting. In this study, the efficiency of surgical manipulation with and without CGC for controlling a pair of bimanual surgical robots is evaluated by analysing the level of coordination of two independent operators. Fitts' law is used to compare the quality of movement with or without CGC. A total of 40 subjects have been recruited for this study and the results show that the proposed CGC framework exhibits significant improvement (p<0.05) on all the motion indices used for quality assessment. This study demonstrates that visual guidance is an implicit yet effective way of communication during collaborative tasks for robotic surgery. Detailed experimental validation results demonstrate the potential clinical value of the proposed CGC framework. © 2012 Biomedical Engineering Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200126
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.182
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, Kawai-
dc.contributor.authorSun, Loiwah-
dc.contributor.authorMylonas, George P.-
dc.contributor.authorJames, David Rc C-
dc.contributor.authorOrihuela-Espina, Felipe-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Guangzhong-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-26T23:11:10Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-26T23:11:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of Biomedical Engineering, 2012, v. 40, n. 10, p. 2156-2167-
dc.identifier.issn0090-6964-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200126-
dc.description.abstractThe use of multiple robots for performing complex tasks is becoming a common practice for many robot applications. When different operators are involved, effective cooperation with anticipated manoeuvres is important for seamless, synergistic control of all the end-effectors. In this paper, the concept of Collaborative Gaze Channelling (CGC) is presented for improved control of surgical robots for a shared task. Through eye tracking, the fixations of each operator are monitored and presented in a shared surgical workspace. CGC permits remote or physically separated collaborators to share their intention by visualising the eye gaze of their counterparts, and thus recovers, to a certain extent, the information of mutual intent that we rely upon in a vis-à-vis working setting. In this study, the efficiency of surgical manipulation with and without CGC for controlling a pair of bimanual surgical robots is evaluated by analysing the level of coordination of two independent operators. Fitts' law is used to compare the quality of movement with or without CGC. A total of 40 subjects have been recruited for this study and the results show that the proposed CGC framework exhibits significant improvement (p<0.05) on all the motion indices used for quality assessment. This study demonstrates that visual guidance is an implicit yet effective way of communication during collaborative tasks for robotic surgery. Detailed experimental validation results demonstrate the potential clinical value of the proposed CGC framework. © 2012 Biomedical Engineering Society.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Biomedical Engineering-
dc.subjectCollaborative surgical task-
dc.subjectHuman-robot interface-
dc.subjectPerceptual docking-
dc.subjectRobotic surgery-
dc.subjectEye tracking-
dc.titleCollaborative gaze channelling for improved cooperation during robotic assisted surgery-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10439-012-0578-4-
dc.identifier.pmid22581476-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867232603-
dc.identifier.volume40-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage2156-
dc.identifier.epage2167-
dc.identifier.eissn1573-9686-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308638400007-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats