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Article: Enhanced frontoparietal network architectures following "gaze-contingent" versus "free-hand" motor learning

TitleEnhanced frontoparietal network architectures following "gaze-contingent" versus "free-hand" motor learning
Authors
KeywordsGraph theory
Gaze-contingent
Surgery
Rehabilitation
Near infrared spectroscopy
Longitudinal motor skill learning
Issue Date2013
Citation
NeuroImage, 2013, v. 64, n. 1, p. 267-276 How to Cite?
AbstractLongitudinal changes in cortical function are known to accompany motor skills learning, and can be detected as an evolution in the activation map. These changes include attenuation in activation in the prefrontal cortex and increased activation in primary and secondary motor regions, the cerebellum and posterior parietal cortex. Despite this, comparatively little is known regarding the impact of the mode or type of training on the speed of activation map plasticity and on longitudinal variation in network architectures. To address this, we randomised twenty-one subjects to learn a complex motor tracking task delivered across six practice sessions in either "free-hand" or "gaze-contingent motor control" mode, during which frontoparietal cortical function was evaluated using functional near infrared spectroscopy. Results demonstrate that upon practice termination, gaze-assisted learners had achieved superior technical performance compared to free-hand learners. Furthermore, evolution in frontoparietal activation foci indicative of expertise was achieved at an earlier stage in practice amongst gaze-assisted learners. Both groups exhibited economical small world topology; however, networks in learners randomised to gaze-assistance were less costly and showed higher values of local efficiency suggesting improved frontoparietal communication in this group. We conclude that the benefits of gaze-assisted motor learning are evidenced by improved technical accuracy, more rapid task internalisation and greater neuronal efficiency. This form of assisted motor learning may have occupational relevance for high precision control such as in surgery or following re-learning as part of stroke rehabilitation. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200108
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.464
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJames, David Rc C-
dc.contributor.authorLeff, Daniel Richard-
dc.contributor.authorOrihuela-Espina, Felipe-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, Kawai-
dc.contributor.authorMylonas, George P.-
dc.contributor.authorAthanasiou, Thanos C.-
dc.contributor.authorDarzi, Ara W.-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Guangzhong-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-26T23:11:08Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-26T23:11:08Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationNeuroImage, 2013, v. 64, n. 1, p. 267-276-
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200108-
dc.description.abstractLongitudinal changes in cortical function are known to accompany motor skills learning, and can be detected as an evolution in the activation map. These changes include attenuation in activation in the prefrontal cortex and increased activation in primary and secondary motor regions, the cerebellum and posterior parietal cortex. Despite this, comparatively little is known regarding the impact of the mode or type of training on the speed of activation map plasticity and on longitudinal variation in network architectures. To address this, we randomised twenty-one subjects to learn a complex motor tracking task delivered across six practice sessions in either "free-hand" or "gaze-contingent motor control" mode, during which frontoparietal cortical function was evaluated using functional near infrared spectroscopy. Results demonstrate that upon practice termination, gaze-assisted learners had achieved superior technical performance compared to free-hand learners. Furthermore, evolution in frontoparietal activation foci indicative of expertise was achieved at an earlier stage in practice amongst gaze-assisted learners. Both groups exhibited economical small world topology; however, networks in learners randomised to gaze-assistance were less costly and showed higher values of local efficiency suggesting improved frontoparietal communication in this group. We conclude that the benefits of gaze-assisted motor learning are evidenced by improved technical accuracy, more rapid task internalisation and greater neuronal efficiency. This form of assisted motor learning may have occupational relevance for high precision control such as in surgery or following re-learning as part of stroke rehabilitation. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImage-
dc.subjectGraph theory-
dc.subjectGaze-contingent-
dc.subjectSurgery-
dc.subjectRehabilitation-
dc.subjectNear infrared spectroscopy-
dc.subjectLongitudinal motor skill learning-
dc.titleEnhanced frontoparietal network architectures following "gaze-contingent" versus "free-hand" motor learning-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.08.056-
dc.identifier.pmid22960153-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867453036-
dc.identifier.volume64-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage267-
dc.identifier.epage276-
dc.identifier.eissn1095-9572-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000312504200025-

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